RaceGrader - Authentic Race Reviews - Swim, Bike, Run

RACE REVIEWS

Posted by: on December, 27 2011

Here is a sampling of some recent reviews published on RaceGrader.  We encourage past participants to share their race experiences to help other athletes prepare for upcoming events.  Tips on the course, where to park, the registration process, etc...can all be very helpful.  To write or read a review of a particular race, just type the name of the race into “Find A Race” on the right side of this page.  Keep Racing!

Review of Southern California Half Marathon & 5K by chsfromca

Positives - Flat course, lots of on-course support (water stops and cheers), great post-race festival, free parking. Negatives - medal had wrong year printed on it and race has never said anything about it to date, no corralling system at start line leads to lots of walker dodging in the first part of the race, kinda boring course (lots of out-and-backs on commercial streets), bib pick up hard to find, poor event shirt - just a white cotton tshirt. I love SRLA kids. I think it is a great organization to get kids in the mindset of running and physcial fitness, but Bell stated it best in the 2013 review: "This is another run that some of the Students Runner’s training for the LA Marathon do and at times this can be a bit difficult as their running etiquette leaves a little to be desired." Adults supervising the SRLA kids - please get them to the back of the starting area.

Review of Skyborne Half Marathon by ashleyspotts

My favorite race to date. It was my second half marathon, & a wonderful experience. It was logistically difficult because all the average price hotels in the area are total dives & there are not many places to eat after. Coming from San Diego county, the drive is nice & not too long. The shirt we got is my go to long sleeve shirt:). All the swag was great! It was such a tiny race! Which I love. It felt intimate. The course is breathtaking. If you're looking for a unique landscape or love the desert, this is a MUST. We ran through the windmills, up to San Gregornio & all the surrounding hills. The sunrise was beautiful. The light broke through the hills like poetry as we ran. It started off cool enough then got VERY hot towards the middle-end. Train in the heat for this! It was well supported with GOOD tasting electrolytes & water. The volunteers were some of the nicest! It was nice T shaped course that was a little more interesting than a typical out & back because of the weird shape. All the miles were marked! Love that! It was mostly flat with some small sloping hills. I would definitely recommend this race. I hope to do it again myself!

Review of REVEL Canyon City Marathon & Half by Scott Devine

RACE: REVEL Canyon City Half Marathon DATE: November 15, 2014 LOCATION: Azusa, CA DISTANCES: Half Marathon/Full Marathon START TIME: 7:00am WEATHER AT START: 54° Partly Cloudy (Half Marathon)/ 38° Partly Cloudy (Full Marathon) FINISHERS: 888 Half/ 625 Full Time to REVEL and to run! This was the inaugural running of the REVEL Canyon City Marathon/Half Marathon, the latest race in the new REVEL race series that also included REVEL Rockies (in July) and REVEL Big Cottonwood (in September). REGISTRATION/EXPO Registration costs for the REVEL Canyon City race start at a pretty wallet-friendly $79.95 for the half marathon and $99.95 for the full marathon (costs are basically the same across all of the REVEL races). Costs do go up as race day approaches, but you can save some additional cash with on-line discounts (check out Raceshed.com), or by becoming part of a team or allowing REVEL to post a few notices to your FB page. And given what the race offers, you’re getting some real bang for your buck. The expo for this year’s first running of the REVEL Canyon City race was held at the Double Tree hotel in Monrovia the day before the race. While the expo was only held on one day, the Friday before the race, the hours ran from 12:00pm- 8:00pm giving you time to hop over during lunch or after work. There wasn’t any race day bib/tech shirt pick-up (due to the time constraints and busing the morning of the race). However, friends and family were able to pick-up your stuff (provided they show a picture of your ID). The expo itself was modestly-sized, but had some vendors on-hand for you to pick up any needed race-day supplies. I volunteered on expo day, handing out bibs/swag bags (and had a lot of fun), and even during the busiest times, participants were able to get their gear within a few minutes. Oh, and the volunteers each got a pretty cool zip up sweatshirt, which is much better than the standard volunteer cotton T-shirt. MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG REVEL clearly has listened to runners’ wants and needs and this shows in their generous swag. The tech shirts for the race were in keeping with the style of the other races in the REVEL series, featuring an orange and light grey color scheme, emblazoned with the Canyon City emblem. There were gender specific shirts (so men and ladies both get individual designs). In addition, no dealing with the short-sleeve/long-sleeve dilemma. Runners had a choice at registration between the short sleeve design, or for an extra $5 they could opt for long sleeves. As for the medals, REVEL has done a great job with their bling. The race medal is an elegant brushed steel design (I’m a sucker for brushed steel) showing off the Canyon City emblem and also using negative space (cut out) to show the REVEL logo. The half marathon featured a blue ribbon (the half bib was also blue) while the full marathoners had an orange ribbon (same as their bib). It really was a great piece of bling. Like Big Cottonwood and Rockies, REVEL Canyon City also has some extra swag. In the swag bag, each runner received a pair of throwaway gloves and a mylar blanket to keep them warm on race morning. With temps on the mountain being rather cool in the morning, that was a welcome bit of swag. Race pictures are free (hear that other races) to all participants and REVEL will post them to your FB page as well. Given the $25- $30 cost most races charge for a single digital photo, this is one great perk. In addition, about two months after the race finishes, racers can expect to receive a short video montage of the race featuring some of their race photos (that they choose) and finisher stats included. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since the race begins way up in the San Gabriel Mountains of Angeles National Park, all racers must be bussed to the start line. Participants parked at the campus of Citrus College or near the finish line to catch a bus to take them up the mountain to the starting area. Parking was free and there were plenty of buses available for racers to make it up to the start line in time. NOTE: Spectators were not able to travel up the mountain, given that there was no parking available. Instead, fans were encouraged to cheer on their friends/family in the town of Azusa or near the finish line. COURSE (HALF MARATHON) The course for all of the REVEL races are “Point-to-Point” and feature significant decreases in elevation. The Canyon City half marathon course drops 900 feet during its 13.1 mile route, while the marathon course decreases a solid 5000 feet during the course of the race. It’s the biggest decline of any full marathon race in North America that also is a BQ (Boston Qualifier). If you’re looking for a PR or a time to qualify for the Boston Marathon, this is a great race to try. There are a few uphill sections on this race, but they aren’t very steep and not too long in duration. You’ll spend the vast majority of the race motoring downhill. NOTE: Downhill races can impact your body (especially your quads) differently than flat courses. I ran the half marathon course, which starts at the 13.1 mile mark of the marathon course (other reviews are available to discuss the full course). The half marathon course starts 12 miles up on Highway 39 and makes its way down the mountains into the town of Azusa. If you’re looking for a nice “get back to nature” course, then you’ll like the Canyon City route. Just as the REVEL Rockies and Big Cottonwood races showed off the natural beauty of their surrounding, Canyon City gives you a glimpse at the Angeles National Park and some nice mountainous vistas. Now this doesn’t mean you’re completely out in the wild as the race does run by a few manmade dams, which are fairly impressive in their own right. The downhill nature of the course allows you the chance to go at a faster pace than normal, so enjoy the slope. The course also does wind, so runners should be wary of running tangents (hugging the turns) to make sure they don’t add unnecessary distance to their race. One other note is that runners are expected to stay on one side of the road as this is the only access to the top of the mountain. Police escorts brought a few cars/service vehicles up the course on occasion. It only happened a few times and runners had plenty of time to make certain they were on the proper side of the street. Once runners reach the bottom of the canyon, they’ll empty out into the town of Azusa for the last two miles. The race itself ends near Azusa Pacific University amidst the cheers of the gathered locals. SERVICES Services on the course are pretty solid… and actually quite good given the fact that everything (supplies, volunteers, power) needed to be brought up the mountain by truck. I continue to be impressed by the “person to porta-potty ratio” at the start of the races, knowing that each one had to traverse a windy mountain road. The course had several water/energy drink stops along the way with a decent amount of volunteers handing out cups. Runners who drink a lot, however, might want to consider bringing a small water bottle with them to tide them over between water stops. Other stops had PowerGel, fruit and candy. There were also medical tents sprinkled along the course. As for mile markers, they were present on the course (one or two did fall over) but given that there was no power available in the wilderness, no digital clocks were present. Runner who wanted to keep track of their time should bring their iPhones or GPS devices. Runner tracking was also available for runners as well as their friends and family. FINISH/POST PARTY Just like with their runner’s swag, REVEL knows how to treat runners after a race. Sure there were plenty of standard snacks after the race… chips, drinks and such. But REVEL also likes to give runners some unexpected (even unorthodox) treats. Just as Big Cottonwood offered pizza and soda (of which I partook generously), Canyon City offered its own unique snacks. Chick-Fil-A offered runners chicken nuggets (I inhaled a few of them) and Marie Calendar’s presented pieces of pie to finishers (talk about some unique carbo loading). One other cool bit of swag fairly unique to REVEL is right after the race, each runner can get a card printed out showing off their race stats (a nice little souvenir for the ride home). RECOMMENDATION NOTE: I am one of the REVEL Race Ambassadors and my registration fee for Canyon City was covered by REVEL. Inaugural races usually have some kind of problem: running out of water, unexpected delays, course problems or some other snafu (which we all typically forgive). Happily, I didn’t find any significant shortcomings at all with REVEL Canyon City. The race officials clearly did their due diligence and put on a fun race. Given that Canyon City is limited to a set number of runners (about 1000 for the half marathon and 700 for the full), it has the benefit of not being an overly-complicated affair like many of the larger races (much less stressful for runners). In addition, it also allows them the opportunity to provide perks not typically seen at larger races. I had a real fun time running REVEL Canyon City. I plan for it to be an annual addition to my race schedule. Run on!

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Irvine by speedygonzales

What a great race. I did the 5k and had a blast. We started on time. split into two waves, as there were 300+ in the 5k, which was smart - i went in the second wave. There were tons of volunteers and good signage, i never felt lost. The aid station was well stocked. After the race, i got the FREE brunch at the food truck. It was nice to have options (3 or 4 trucks), the steak and cheese quesadilla was awesome. The band was fun while we ate brunch and then i got a stretch in with the Equinox people. It was cool to get some snacks and water handed to us at the finish and the medal is great. I was pretty amazed at the quality and weight of it - it is even a coaster (i already have it sitting on my desk)! They had computers and screens in the Lexus area where you could see your result right then and there. Needless to say, i did not win my age group, but those that did got these cool tiles. I got a chance to take a pic on the podium. Hoping to see it turn up on FB!! All in all, this was a great race experience. I hope they come back to Irvine next year. I will be running in my race shirt this winter to help share the word about this race, as I love to see great races like this coming to town. Thanks Lexus

Review of Great Donut Run by hubba79

Where else can you run and eat donuts!! Great run for the whole family!! Definitely a good time.

Review of Disneyland Half Marathon by Scott Devine

"Hi Ho Hi Ho, it's off to run we go!" Disney, the uber-company which owns Marvel, Lucasfilm (aka Star Wars), Pixar and is responsible for some great family films and wonderful theme parks, has also become quite the upcoming player in the marathon game. With numerous races each year at Walt Disney World in Orlando and at Disneyland in Anaheim, Mickey and Minnie Mouse seem to lace up their running shoes almost every other weekend. This past Sunday (of Labor Day Weekend), Disney staged the 9th annual Disneyland Half Marathon Weekend (which also included a 10K, 5K and other family events). Amidst the heat and humidity of summer's final "unofficial" weekend, over 15,000 runners donned their respective Disney costumes or mouse ears and lined up to "Let It Go" (yes, they played the song again and again) at the "Sweatiest place on earth." REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registering for Disney events is a race in its own right, as the runs sell out in a matter of hours (and sometime minutes for the combo races). If you want to sign up for a Disney race you best be parked at your keyboard with credit card in hand anxiously counting off the seconds before registration officially opens. And if you're fast enough on the draw to successfully register, be prepared to risk having your bank account "Frozen" due to disappearing funds. Disney races are expensive. Really expensive. As in the most expensive you'll probably find for a race... by far. Registration for the half marathon starts at an astronomical $195 (I guess one of the upsides of it selling out so fast is the price never has a chance to go higher). For those who want to run the "Dumbo Double Dare" (which is a 10K on Saturday followed by the half marathon on Sunday) be prepared to drop a budget crushing $320. Disney is known for high prices, but I know of more than one runner wondering if the a race is worth paying double what you would at most other half marathons simply to have the race "Disneyfied" (more on that in bit). As for packet pick-up, Disney has their expo scheduled at the Disneyland Hotel the days before the race. And be forewarned, runners must pick up their own bib/tech shirt as you are not allowed to send a friend/family member in your stead and there is no race day pick-up. The expo itself is very well set up; Disney is a master when it comes to organization and crowd control. I've heard stories of the expo being incredibly crowded, but I found it pretty easy and quick to navigate thanks to the great organization. Fortunately, they didn't charge for expo parking at the Disneyland Hotel (I was given a paper waiver by the attendant for 30 minutes... I stayed over an hour). Parking is a bit limited there so you might find it better to park at Downtown Disney, pay the parking costs (rather high) and make an afternoon of it. Oh, and the expo is decent with a respectable number of various vendors present, a few photo ops set-up (Disney loves the pics) and numerous speakers for those who want some race info. Have I seen bigger and better expos... yes. But, the expo had all of the necessities and a few cool accessories I hadn't seen before. And yes, there is a separate section for Disney race merchandise. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since Disneyland is a tourist destination, there are plenty of hotels available for those who want to stay down in Anaheim the night before their respective races. And given the pre-dawn (5:30am) start times, it's not a bad idea to grab a hotel to save yourself some a.m. driving. As for me, I did motor down from LA the day of the race (yup, I left at 3:30am) and it was a pretty easy drive (one of the few times you won't find traffic on the I-5). Like the rest of the commuting masses, I had to pay $17 to park in the Disney lots, which is rather pricey and in keeping with Disney charging a pretty penny for everything (given the high cost of the race, you think they'd give a break or discount for parking). FYI, another plus for going the hotel route is that many had shuttles to take you to and from the start line (although some hotels charge for parking in their lot anyway, which makes it a wash) or you can just hoof if there, using the walk as a warm-up. T-SHIRT/MEDALS Disney prides itself on having great bling and cool shirts. For those running the Dumbo Double Dare, you'll not only get a medal for each race, but a bonus medal, not to mention additional medals should you be participating in Disney's Coast-to-Coast Challenge Program. Careful, getting all of that Disney bling can cause neck injuries if you try to wear it all at once and channel your inner "Flavor Flav" (but most consider the risk worth it). This year's half marathon medal featured a large script "D" amidst the Disneyland castle and hung from a pretty multi-colored ribbon (kind of a throwback to Disneyland's early days). It really is a nice medal. As for the tech shirts, each race featured a different design and color scheme. For the half marathon, the 2014 shirt was "pea green" in color and featured a very low-key image of the Disneyland castle (again, a retro-design celebrating Disneyland's origin). At first I was disappointed with the shirt (especially give Disney's typical gift for great design), but I have a feeling it will grow on me in time. And if you're willing to spend some more bucks (try several more) you can always purchase one of the "I did it" shirts which feature a running Mickey. COURSE It's a race through Disneyland, so what more do you need to know? Quite a bit actually. One of the big selling points of the various Disney races is getting to run through and around the parks, but it's one of those things that looks a bit better on paper than when it comes to execution. The Disneyland Half Marathon features a fairly flat pseudo-loop course. You start out near the Disneyland Hotel and make your way off toward the parks. After navigating the streets and parking lots near Disneyland for a little bit, you hit the parks themselves starting around mile 2. First off, it's the California Adventure Park, where you wind your way through the various streets. And I've got to admit that is was pretty surreal to run down the main drag of Radiator Springs (and I'm certainly no Lightning McQueen). After you do your trek through California Adventure, you make your way into Disneyland itself, heading down Main Street and meandering through Adventureland, Fantasyland, Tomorrowland and Toon Town before heading back out of the park. All throughout the park there are numerous opportunities for runners to stop and take pictures, be it of Disney sights or with the costumed characters who are out in force. If you are selfie addict or love snapping race photos, then this is your slice of heaven. It's one of the main reasons why the median race times at Disney races are so slow (people stop for umpteen photos with Maleficient, Mickey, the soldiers from Toy Story, etc). It can cause a bit of a chaos as the runners who don't feel the need to take photos must dodge the runners who toss race etiquette out the window and make a beeline across the course the second they see Mike Wazowski and Sully waving. Of course, Disney races have their own flavor and most people forgive those caught up in the moment. In addition, many of runners are dressed in Disney-themed costumes (some of them are really spectacular); I myself ran the course sporting a pair of Mickey Mouse ears strapped to my cabeza. And then there is the rest of the race... People who think that the entire half marathon is run around in and around Disneyland might be in for a bit of a surprise. After mile 4, you leave Disneyland and the characters behind; from this point on, the race transforms into much more of a standard half marathon. You actually spend the majority of the race running along the city streets of Anaheim. Sure there are bands and spectators, but the Disney "magical" touch is mostly absent from mile 4 until around mile 12 (when you make your way back toward the Disneyland Hotel). This is not to say the race is boring, just different. Miles 7-8 featured a parade of parked classic cars lining the street (and given my race performance that day, I would have gladly accepted a ride). And right around mile 9 you get to run near the Honda Center and straight into Angels' Stadium for a lap around the field (complete with cheering fans in the stadium and images projected up on the jumbotron). From that point on, you continue your trek through Anaheim, eventually arriving back to the Disneyland area and finishing right by the Disneyland Hotel. COURSE SERVICES As you would expect, Disney's course services are solid. From the organization of the start corrals (you must submit prior race times for corral placement) to the pre-race instructions (featuring energetic spokespeople projected on a big screen and a visit from Mickey and Minnie) this is where Disney shows off its expertise. The course itself featured numerous water/Powerade stops, all very well manned by volunteers, as well as a Clif stop at mile 9 where they handed out energy gels. Safety personnel and medical tents were present (and hopefully not utilized too much). MarathonFoto was out there snapping pictures, although they seemed to be mostly positioned in Disneyland and at Angels' Stadium (there were quite a few large gaps where no photographers were in my field of view). Mile markers were present for each mile (and quite large) and each had a digital clock to show the current "gun time," which is nice. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY Disney continues with their ability to make the masses comfortable and happy with a very well-organized finish area. After receiving your medal from the happy volunteers and being handed a bottle of water, you're directed to the finisher's photo area. You also receive your post-race snacks in a pre-packed box that doubles as a carry case. Oh, and they also gave each runner wet cooling towels, a very nice and refreshing touch. You're then directed through gear check and into the main staging area where you can meet up with family members, line-up for a massage or listen to the post race awards. Other races should send representatives for pointers on how to stage their post-race celebration. RECOMMENDATION So, the big question: "Is the Disneyland Half Marathon worth the extremely high $195 registration cost"? It's a tough question to answer and best left for the individual to decide. If you love all things Disney, you'll happily hand over your hard-earned dollars without batting an eye. There are some great aspects to the race (well organized, photo/costume opportunities, cool bling) and a smattering of disappointing aspects (feels very corporate, course is not the greatest once you leave Disneyland, congested course). I've run the Disneyland Half Marathon twice (2009 & 2014) and I am glad I did it. I'm also signed up for the Avengers Superhero Half Marathon in November and the Star Wars Half Marathon in January... and that is a lot of money spent (almost $600 for just the three races without hotel, parking and souvenirs factored in), especially for running what is essentially the same course. It'd be nice to see Disney offer a "tour pass" like the Rock 'n' Roll series to save runners some cash. If not, I see limiting my Disney races in the future (probably just doing the Star Wars Half Marathon) and spending my money on other races that are a little more "cost effective."

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Ventura by tseng14

I ran the 10K and am definitely adding this to my annual race calendar. The course was beautiful! The volunteers and water stations were ample and smartly placed. This is a premium race just like they explain it is. The medals are awesome and you can even use it as a coaster! The party at the finish line was a blast - great food and beer for all.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Ventura by Scott Devine

RACE: Lexus LaceUp Ventura DATE: October 24, 2015 DISTANCES: Half Marathon/10K/5K LOCATION: Ventura, CA  (Shoreline Park) START TIME: • 7:00 am Half/10K • 7:45 am 5K WEATHER AT START: 61 degrees Welcome to the second stop on the Lexus LaceUp 2015 race series. After an enjoyable jaunt last week in Irvine, the LaceUp crew found themselves gathering pre-dawn (daylight savings ends next week) at Promenade Park overlooking the ocean in scenic Ventura. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP The entire Lexus LaceUp series offers very reasonable registration rates. For Ventura, the “earilest bird” rates started low ($25 for 5K, $45 for 10K, $70 for the half marathon) and increased as race day approached. But even for the latest of comers, the rates never got too high ($40 for 5K, $60 for 10K and $85 for the half marathon). On top of that, Lexus LaceUp offered plenty of online discounts (and some really nice ones too) so in the end the rates were quite light on the bank account. LaceUp Ventura offered packet pick-up the two days before the race at a local Roadrunner store (yours truly was there on Friday lending a hand to the crew), but also allowed same day pick-up (at no additional charge). TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Racers driving to Promenade Park had plenty of easy parking available at the Ventura Fairgrounds. The cost for parking was $5, which is rather reasonable given what some other races charge for parking at their races (talking to you Disney). T-SHIRT/MEDALS/SWAG For people running other races in the LaceUp series, the swag was familiar. The tech shirt was similar to the one given at Irvine, but the race location “Ventura” was printed on the sleeve. Racers also got another reusable shopping bag to carry their swag (I look forward to hitting Trader Joe’s with mine). Racers also received the cool “honeycomb” shaped finisher’s medal. The ribbon (green for 5K, blue for 10K and white for the half marathon) also listed the Ventura location on it. The race also served as another notch for those trying to achieve special challenge medals. Those people who run all 4 Lexus LaceUp races (Irvine, Ventura, Palos Verdes & Riverside) will earn a special “LaceUp Challenge” medal. And those people who ran the Ventura Marathon (back on Sep. 13th), LaceUp Ventura this past weekend and the upcoming Santa Barbara Half (Nov. 7th) will earn the special “805 Challenge” medal. Bring on the bling. And Runner Buzz was once again on hand, providing runners with free digital photos of the race. COURSE For LaceUp Ventura, each of the races shared common start and finish locations, as well as sharing parts of their courses. The 5K and 10K races utilized a loop course that began at Promenade Park and headed down the coast on surface streets before looping around and heading back up along the water. I ran the half marathon, which utilized a good chunk of the 10K course before continuing up (running parallel to the beach) along the oceanside bike path. The course then turned inland, utilizing a lengthy “out and back” route that followed the bike path, turning around at mile 8. We did cross a few streets during the course of the race, but police were present to ensure that traffic stopped to give the right-of-way to runners. According to the elevation charts, the half marathon course featured a slight upgrade as we headed inland (gaining about 120′ over three miles) and then back down after the turnaround. To be honest, I hardly noticed any incline, but after the turnaround I convinced myself mentally that I was indeed running downhill (a little bit of a “placebo” effect). Those people who have run other races in Ventura will definitely remember parts of the course, but who is going to complain about running near the ocean (a nice view). COURSE SERVICES The course services for the LaceUp Ventura were in keeping with those at the Irvine race. “Arrow” signs and volunteers were present at key points along the course to make sure that runners stayed on course. Water/electrolyte stops were present about every 2 miles (they served double duty on the out and back portions) with volunteers to make sure we stayed hydrated and to give some encouragement. Mile markers were present along the course but not digital timers except for at the finish line. Once again runners had B-tags on their bibs, which provided race results and info. People could also utilize the mobile “LaceUp app” for information about the race. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY The finish line services and post party were reminiscent of the Irvine race, as runners got their medals, snacks and then could check out a few vendors (including the Lexus display) or get a complimentary massage. As for me, I made my way right to the food trucks and their free grub for runners. This time around I chose a spicy chicken quesadilla and washed it down at the beer garden with another brew provided by Sierra Nevada. RECOMMENDATION This was another enjoyable race in the Lexus LaceUp series (for the record, I am one of the Lexus LaceUp ambassadors). While these races don’t feature some of the polish or flash of the bigger (and more costly) races, these are intimate and informal affairs and worth the effort of waking up early and pounding some pavement.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Palos Verdes Half Marathon by Runner3D

The Pre race was easy-pasy. We got to the parking smoothly and with no wait even though we had to take the shuttle since the other two parking lots were over capacity. It didn't take long to get to the venue from where we got on the shuttle. I picked up my packet (only the bib) that morning and did not have to deal with any lines for the half marathon. I was told that I would only be able to pick up my shirt and bag after the race. There were no lines at the porta potties so I was able to take care of business and jump into where the race started. The 13.1 course was a scenic route along Palos Verdes Drive South and Paseo Del Mar. Anyone familiar with PV knows to expect hills and the PV half did not disappoint. Rolling hills throughout the course made the run a fun challenge. There were plenty of volunteers with water/electrolyte gels, mile markers, porta potties, & split mats. Got to the end and received some trail mix, a bottle of fiji water and medal. Post race I picked up my bag and T shirt. By that time one of the volunteers said that there were no more women's small. However they let me choose a men's small in lieu of them running out. Although the t shirt is a really cool tech T shirt, the men's small is still too big for me. There were a wide selection of vendors and sponsors at the event sharing samples and informational literature. This half provided a bunch and there were two options: crossiant, apple, cheese and boiled egg box, and a quiche with tangerine.I really wanted some protein so I picked the latter of the two but wished that between the two that we'd get more of the quiche since it was small in size. If I had to be picky I wish there was more balance between the two. There was an option to get your free after the race beer, but I don't drink. Overall it was a great race and I'd definitely do it again.

Review of Temecula Wine Country Half Marathon by ashleyspotts

This was my first half marathon, and the experience could not have been better. The t shirt was lovely & the swag good. The whole course was stunning beyond words. Hot air balloons rose as we began. The mayor spoke at the start which was really, really neat. The pacers were on target & so helpful. The course was lovely. It was easy enough for a beginner, but still with hills for some challenge. We passed all sorts of beautiful homes, yards, vineyards, & many animals! It was quiet & peaceful. Weather was very nice for that time of year. It was well supported with aid stations, first aid, & porta potties. It was a moderate crowd which was nice. We weren't running over eachother, but it was well loved. Looking back after having done a few half's now, people seemed so generally happy to be at the race. It was mostly women...Maybe that's why. There was a neat comradery. Post race was nice. The complimentary wine & glass was awesome! There was band & some good booths. Only thing that was not great was the shuttle service back from the race. We waited forever & it was not clear where we were being picked up. Would HIGHLY recommend.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Riverside by tlujan

Thank you for a great event. It was close and convenient to where I live. Nice and easy 5k course. I felt that the check in was nice and easy. The staff was very friendly and was able to socialize with you. The only down fall was not enough photographers out on the course but I guess we can take our own pictures with our phones. The post race event was fun. I never have went to a beer garden in all the other races that I have done but I thought I would give a cheers to a great race on 12~13~14. I made history running with my husband on such a memorable day!!! I give all the thanks to you for making this event happen and I am more than willing to offer my time on next years series. Great job Team Lexus LaceUp!!!

Review of Orange County Turkey Trot by jeffcar1

Used to run the Dana Point race up until a few years ago, as it just got way too large. Parking, and logistics make for a long day for Thanksgiving. When I heard about this one, so close to home, smaller field, and less expensive, I decided to give it a try. For an inaugural race, it was put on very well, sure it started late, mainly due to a lot of people who just showed up because they couldn't get into the larger race down south. Even with the late start though, I was still able to get home far earlier than if I had done Dana Point. The course was flat and fast, great tee-shirts, medals, pie and other freebies after the race. I will definitely be back next year and I am sure they will be more than ready for an even larger field next year.

Review of Long Beach International Marathon/Half/5K by kjensen16

I ran the Long Beach half last year and loved the course so I thought I would run my 1st full marathon this year here. Expo: The expo is great! Very well organized. They are ready to take on any problem that you might have as well. They were very quick getting our bibs and shirts to us. The shirts were not the best shirts that Long Beach has had. Really really really did not like that they were white, but the sea shell design on the side was nice. They were also shaped a bit odd. The official merchandise store had quite a large selection of stuff. Loved the hats this year. The expo itself was huge. It really does make OC's expo look funny. It is very spacious and has pretty much all the vendors that you could possibly want. Pre Race: The marathon does not have half as many people as the half marathon so everything is pretty easy for the pre race. It was quick to drop off our stuff at the UPS vans and there were plenty of port o johns with no lines at all. The runners village was pretty great too. It gave our group a great spot to set up camp. It was a great place for our group to meet up before and after the race. Course: The marathon starts off at 6am with the Voice of America's Marathons, Rudy Novotny! The course goes through parts of downtown Long Beach then goes up and over the bridge to the other side of the bay. Then you come back and run on the bike path on the beach. The marathon was not as packed as the half was last year on this part, but the bike path does get very crowded. I would not suggest running on the sand either. From the beach you head north through the neighborhoods as you make your way up to CSULB. There are some pretty interesting houses to look at. The crowd support was awesome! People were setting up aid stations right out of their own house. There were also people all over the place handing out bananas, oranges and candy. These were not people that were associated with the race themselves, just some amazing people cheering on the runners. The aid stations were great too. I believe there were 24 stations all together with one being about every mile or so. You leave the neighborhood streets for a bit when you get onto Atherton. From there you go through Cal Stat Long Beach. Lots of students out cheering you on! Then you start your way back. Running down Ocean was one of my favorite parts of this race (even though I drive it every day to work). It is a beautiful way to finish up a great race. Nice big houses on your right and the ocean on your left. The finish line is great with Rudy calling all the runners in. Post race: We were given the best medal I've ever gotten. Since this was the 30th anniversary it was a special seashell medal. I really love it. We were given a water and a bag full of snacks. We did not finish this race very quickly at all so there were no foil blankets by the time we got there, which I was bummed about. Not a big thing. The beer garden was alright. Just make sure you get over there before 1pm when it closes. Spectators: I had my family and friends that wanted to be out on the course for me. The best place that I found for spectators that want to view their runners more than once and not have to move around is right by the start/ finish line. They can send off their runner at the start line, walk across the grass and see their runner at about mile 6.5 (half and full). Then if they walk up shoreline drive a little bit they can see their runner cross the finish line. Other great spectator spots that would be reasonably easy to get to is up by Cal State Long Beach and over on 7th street by Blair field at recreation park. Overall a great race! I'll run at least the half next year for sure!

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Riverside by kcass

Nice location, but parking lot was 3/4 mile away, so better to park on streets in neighborhood surrounding park. Published start time info was not accurate. Poor course markings for 10K, 5K seemed well marked. Nice shirt and participant medal, brunch trucks and beer garden were great. Packet pickup was too far away from race venue and very inconvenient for those in the areas south/west of Riverside.

Review of Arroyo Creek Half Marathon by RaceGrader

POSTED BY RL: I did the initial Camarillo Marathon a few years ago put together by Elite Racing and it was a total SNAFU - lack of Porto potties, lack of on course fluids, lack of on- course support.

Review of Silverman 70.3 Ironman by RaceGrader

I can't give anything but straight "A"'s for this event. Ironman did a great job. PRE RACE: We made the decision to arrive on Friday to help avoid any stress. It was a great decision. We were able to check in around 6pm with no lines. That gave us the ability to be ahead of the crowds on Saturday. With this race, you are required to drop your run gear at T2 and bike at T1 the day before the race (although, you were able to access both transitions early on race day). Because we checked in Friday, we had our transitions set up my mid afternoon on Saturday and were able to relax the rest of the day. Ironman Village was a bit small but took place at the Henderson Pavillion. A great location for the finish line. RACE DAY: Ironman provided shuttles from T2 up to Lake Mead. We arrived around 5AM and did not have to wait in line. Because of the recent heat, there was a serious chance that wetsuits would not be allowed. But after measuring the temperature on race day at 75 degrees, wetsuits were declared legal for the event. A big relief for those that rely on the wetsuit for buoyancy! THE SWIM course was a basic triangle. Out, over, and back into the beach. There were numerous buoys for sighting and the water was clear. The most difficult part of the swim was the "convergence" of waves. It seemed like many people thought it was a bit crowded out there. Maybe they could move the waves to 4 minutes apart instead of 3? Also, it was tough to get a feel for the distance remaining on the swim back to the beach. I was sighting off a building on the beach that was at a much higher elevation than the water level. This gave the impression the beach was miles away. Not an event problem, but just something to consider for future athletes. Ironman did number the buoys. If I had known this, I would've been able to use them to determine how far was still remaining. Good reason to go to the pre-race meeting (I didn't attend). BIKE: Hills. I could pretty much stop right there. This bike course is brutally tough. There is very little relief from the climbs. I believe you climb over 4,200 feet with a net increase of nearly 2,700. Way more UP than DOWN. The bike course reminded me of the movie Ground Hog Day. Climb...climb...climb...down...climb...climb...climb...down...etc.. A good strategy is very important on this course. You can NOT just go out an hammer away at these hills. You'll have nothing left for the run (or the huge climb that awaits you at mile 54). It's very important to stay within your own pace and have a very good nutrition plan. Take a look at the number of people with DNF's for this event. I'm sure many of them were the people passing me as they powered up every hill. I would say this to summarize the bike course. First 10 miles are rolling hills (mostly climbing). The next 12 miles are very difficult. Basically all climbing with not much downhill relief. The next 12 miles are the reverse (these 12 miles are out and back). Although, the headwind made it difficult to really take full advantage of the net "downhill". At mile 42 there is a 2-3 mile climb. It's a serious grind from inside Lake Mead to the top of the hill by Lake Las Vegas entrance. From mile 42 to 52ish you are mostly down and flat. It seems like this is the time you'd make up some ground. But the race gods turned ugly and ruined those plans with a fairly decent headwind that taxed your legs even further. At mile 52 you encounter yet another big climb. I didn't hear much "chatter" on the course to that point. But when my fellow participants turned the corner to see this hill, many were cursing and calling for the course designers head! After climbing pretty much all day, you have to grind it out one last time from mile 52 pretty much all the way to the transition area. I finished the bike 45 minutes slower than my Half Ironman distance P.R. And I worked way harder! My bike time of 3:25 put me just above the 50 percentile in my age division. THE RUN: Did I mention it was hot? You don't really feel the heat until you put on those running shoes and started to go. Someone mentioned it may have reached 96 degrees in the afternoon. So again, nutrition is key! Fortunately Ironman did a great job with their aid stations. The course was a total of 3 loops and there were 4 aid stations. So 12 total chances to get "refreshed" on the 13.1 mile run. In most cases, loops tend to get a bit boring. But it's great for spectators. They can set up in the shade and see you run by the same point 6 times. The aid stations were fully stocked with ice (savior), water, propel, cola, chips, pretzels, oranges, banana's, gu's, etc.... it was basically a "much needed" buffet with enthusiastic volunteers. There were also a few "run through" mist systems on the course. And one was stationed with a guy hosing people down. That felt awesome!! Besides fighting the heat, this run course was HILLY. You think you had enough with the hills on the bike, but there really isn't any FLAT in Silverman. During the 4+mile loop, you go down 2 miles than up 2 miles. Repeat. Repeat. It's similar to running long intervals. If you grind out the "up" you can take advantage of the "down". Although with the demanding bike course and heat, I saw a ton of athletes walking or being sidelined with cramps/hamstring issues. POST RACE: Anyone that has done a long distance event knows you really feel brain dead after you cross the finish line. It's often times difficult to even function. Ironman had some great volunteers. As I crossed the line, someone became my personal escort. They took me to get my medal, remove my timing chip, grab my finishers hat, handed me an ice cold water, took me to get a finisher picture, then directed me to the athlete tent. It was a great service. Thank you to whoever you were helping me out! The athlete tent had a great setup with a full buffet of food and drinks. After cooling down, you pick up all your gear that was driven down by Ironman from Lake Mead. It was very organized and (again) staffed with great volunteers. Someone even had bagged my bike gear left on the ground at T2. First class all the way. OVERALL: I heard a few people saying this is the toughest course in America. Other's said they put out more effort on this course than they needed for a full Ironman. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but the course was more than just a challenge. It was VERY TOUGH. Proof were the number of people suffering on a course. But the with the great challenge, comes a great feeling of accomplishment. Knowing you can survive and finish an event like this gives you great confidence for any future challenges. Silverman was a great event and Ironman did a great job.

Review of Arroyo Creek Half Marathon by RaceGrader

POSTED BY RL: I did the initial Camarillo Marathon a few years ago put together by Elite Racing and it was a total SNAFU - lack of Porto potties, lack of on course fluids, lack of on- course support.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Irvine by Scott Devine

RACE: Lexus LaceUp Irvine DATE: October 17, 2015 DISTANCES: 10K/5K LOCATION: Irvine, CA (Mike Ward Community Park) START TIME: 8:00am 5K/ 8:10 10K WEATHER AT START: 70 degrees FINISHERS: 10K- 229 5K-  480 Tie those running shoes for the first stop on the Lexus LaceUp 2015 race series. The series also includes races in Ventura (Oct. 24th), Palos Verdes (Nov. 14th) and Riverside (Dec. 6th). The Irvine race was a little different than the others in the series in that it offered only 10K/5K distances, whereas the other races also include the half marathon. The fact that racers were only running 10K or 5K didn't seem to dim anyone's spirits, as a festive bunch of runners gathered in the park on a Saturday morning for fun jaunt around Irvine. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registration costs for the entire Lexus LaceUp series are reasonable with rates that are below the fees charged on bigger corporate race series. For Irvine, rates on the 5K started at $25 for earliest of birds on their way up to $40 the day before race day. The 10K was a similar low price ranging from $45- $60 depending on when you signed up. In addition, Lexus had plenty of discounts listed on line (check out social media) as well as discounts offered by their "ambassador corps" (including yours truly). A discount is also available for runners who sign up for the "LaceUp Challenge" (running all 4 races in the series). The race offered packet pick-up the day before at one of the local running stores, but also allowed same day pick-up (at no extra charge... just be sure you get there early). As the race was a little bit of a drive from my home, I opted for the race day pick-up and it only took me 5 minutes to get my bib and swag from the great race volunteers. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since the race was being held at a local park (Mike Ward Community Park), they had the lot reserved for the runners, along with an overflow parking lot at a nearby church for the latest of late comers. T-SHIRT/MEDALS/SWAG While the Lexus LaceUp Irvine 10K/5K was a more intimate affair than some other races, they certainly didn't skimp on the swag. All participants received a cool black tech shirt (with the race location on the sleeve) and a stylish "honeycomb-esque" shaped finisher's medal (5K had green ribbons, 10K blue ribbons). FYI, an extra medal will be awarded everyone who completes all 4 races in the LaceUp Challenge. For the Irvine race, early arriving runners also got a little extra bit of swag as Sierra Nevada handed out bottle openers (a nice sign of things to come after the race). And Lexus was on hand giving out some sweet water bottles to anyone who stopped by their water table before or after the race. And the race swag was presented in a neat reusable shopping bag (which is great now that supermarkets in CA charge for bags), which was a nice touch. And the swag didn't end there as all runners were given "free" race photos for Facebook (and to download), courtesy of Runner Buzz. In this age of paying $30 for a single digital race photo, free pics of your sweaty self are a very welcome perk. COURSE The LaceUp Irvine 10K/5K featured "out and back" courses. While both races started and finished at the same spot in the park, the 5K and 10K each basically had their own unique courses, which kept congestion to a minimum. The courses for the race basically took runners along the bike/running paths near the park and ran us along one of the municipal waterways (of course we're in drought-ridden CA, so there really wasn't any water to speak of). While it wasn't an overly stunning course visually, I enjoyed the route. Fortunately, we never had to cross any city streets as the bike path dipped under the surface streets, which also added a few inclines and declines to an otherwise flat course. In addition, the race featured an "open" course, which meant we did share the route with non-racers (aka other runners/walkers and bikers) but it never really presented any kind of difficulty or bottleneck. COURSE SERVICES For a 10K/5K, outside of signs pointing the direction, you typically don't need too much in the way of course services. Signs and volunteers lined the course at key points to make sure runners didn't make a wrong turn. For the 10K, the race provided a water/energy drink/snack stop at mile 2, which also doubled as the stop on mile 4. On races of this length, I carry my own water bottle, so I don't need to stop. But I'm also sure to wave and thank the volunteers as I run by. And as for the important porta potty question, the race featured a good number of porta potties (actually pretty nice ones as porta potties go) at the start finish/area. The course, however, didn't sport any additional porta potties, so runners had extra motivation to finish quickly... should nature be calling. Mile markers signs were posted at each mile, but the only timer appeared at start/finish, so be sure to bring your own GPS watch if you need to track your progress during the race. Runners all had B-tags on their bibs, which provided you race results and info on-line after the race was finished. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY As we crossed the finish line, runners were greeted by volunteers and handed their race medals. After that, runners could go visit the finish line area which featured a few tents from local vendors and a nice car display from series sponsor Lexus. I was curious to check out their great SUV, but given how sweaty I was, I opted to be kind and not take a seat inside one of the pristine vehicles. One final great race perk: each runner got free brunch food from one of three food trucks. I opted for a "stadium dog" from Dogzilla. And to wash it all down... how about a free beer from Sierra Nevada in the beer garden? Now most people wouldn't think that chowing down on a chilli dog and beer at 9am is anyway to start the day. But after running a 10K, it was a bite (and drink) of heaven. RECOMMENDATION Since I'm one of the Lexus LaceUp Series ambassadors, I naturally have a personal interest in the series. But I enjoyed the LaceUp race experience this weekend. Some races, especially bigger ones with several thousand participants, can be overly complicated and a bit stressful. I liked the low-key and intimate nature of this race. I drove to the location, easily parked my car, got my bib/swag lickity split and had a nice casual run with several hundred other enthusiastic racers. And afterward I got to chat with friends and have a beer and some grub before getting on with my day. Not a bad way to spend a Saturday morning. Looking forward to running the next leg in the LaceUp series (Ventura) next weekend.

Review of Shoreline Half Marathon, 5K, 10K by

As most distance runners know, July is not the prime month for races. Summer vacations and summer heat limit the number of races available around the country. And since the San Francisco Marathon conflicts with ComicCon this year (yup, the geek side of me wins out there) I was desperately looking for a local SoCal race. And with that I chose the Shoreline Half Marathon/10K/5K, a 2nd year race located in Ventura. Definitely a race on the small side (big contrast to the Peachtree Road Race I ran last week with 60,000 runners) all three races combined feature less than 1,000 runners. This year's installment had about 570 people running the half marathon distance and I decided to give it a look see. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registration for the Shoreline Half Marathon was definitely on the inexpensive side with rates only getting to $75 right before the start of the race (no race day registration). What really made the cost reasonable was a 30% discount courtesy of raceshed.com (check 'em out) for a limited number of early registrants. In the end, the race only cost me in the neighborhood of $45 a real bargain in these days of ever-increasing registration costs. In regards to packet pick-up, participants could grab their bibs and shirts the day before the race at the Sport Authority store in Ventura. But like many participants, I opted to save the drive and pick-up my packet on race day (no additional cost). And since I arrived early on race day, I only waited about 5 minutes in order to get my stuff. The lines got longer as the start time approached, but they moved quickly. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING It was about an hour drive from the valley along the 101 to get to Ventura and the start location. As for parking, you did have several options. You can either park at the Crown Plaza parking structure for $8 (some businesses do validate). I also heard you could park at the nearby fairgrounds for $5. I did arrive early on race day and was able to snag one of the cool beachside parking spots (along with the surfers) for a minuscule $2. T-SHIRT/MEDALS The Shoreline Half Marathon provided its participants with a tech running shirt (manufactured by A4) dark blue in color, featuring the Shoreline logo on the front and race sponsors on the back. The shirt was the same for runners of the half marathon, 10K and 5K and is a decent if unremarkable looking shirt. It should be noted that the race also gave all of the race participants a water bottle sporting the race logo, a nice gesutre. The finisher's medal for the race was on the small side (guess we're getting spoiled with our bling) featuring the race's logo and connected by a plain yellow ribbon. One disappointing fact is that finishers received the exact same medal regardless of whether they ran the 5K, 10K or half marathon. I understand it's a cost-saving measure, but it'd be nice in the future to see them differentiate between the races, even if it just means different ribbon designs or different colors on the medal. One additional nice touch from the race is the inclusion of free digital race photos (taken by Santa Barbara Pix). While there were only a few photographers on the course, I did manage to find a start and finish picture along with one more of myself on the course. COURSE The Shoreline Half Marathon features a rather circuitous course (especially for the half marathon runners) that travels along the beach and up through a nearby neighborhood. The course itself is only about 6 miles long, meaning the half marathon runners needed to complete two loops (with an additional spoke added on the first lap). A huge map near the start line displayed the course layout and the race officials explained each race distance route in detail. Given the windy course, I was a little nervous that we might make a wrong turn, but volunteers were situated to make sure we didn't go awry. The course did cut across a few streets with traffic, but police were stationed at each intersection and the runners always had the right of way. One bit of a headache was the beach portion of the race had us running along on the bike path, which wasn't closed to the public. While most people steered clear of the path that day, you did have to meander through some non-participants, especially near the start and finish line. The course itself was basically flat with the exception of two hills leading near the 101 freeway. The course was most enjoyable as we ran along the beach (dodging people notwithstanding) and fairly scenic around mile 6 as you ran fairly near the water and could see the surfers en masse trying to catch waves. The section of the race through the nearby neighborhood (and featuring one turnaround) was rather unremarkable. A note about weather conditions, as the July sun was rather brutal at times and the course afforded little shade... be prepared to cook out there. COURSE SERVICES Course services for the race were in keeping with its size. Water and Gatorade tables were present about every 1.5 miles and Gu's were available at two of the stops. While there were only a limited number of volunteers on the course, they were working hard and seemed to be able manage things fairly well. Basic mile markers were visible on the course, but the only digital clock was at the start/finish, so be sure to bring a GPS. One thing worth noting is the race was timed, although there were only sensors at the start/finish so runners were on their honor not to cut things short. EMTs were located at various points on the course and I did notice a few support people riding around on bicycles making sure runners were okay. Fan support for the race was minimal save for a group of people cheering at the start/finish line, although I did see this one lone spectator at various points during the race (he was traveling to different places on a bike) and I applaud his enthusiasm and support. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY Pretty basic at the end, as you were handed your medal once you crossed the finish line and were directed into the gathering area. The race booth featured some water cups and orange slices, but not much else. A few goodbyes to fellow racers and then I made my way back to my car. RECOMMENDATION It's a little hard to compare this race to other races, given that it was by far the "smallest" race I've completed in 2014 and felt like a Mom & Pop store trying to compete against Target for your business. Given the big production connected to other races (expo trips, parking headaches, huge throngs of people) I did appreciate the easy access and intimate feel. And while it was far less polished than other races, the people involved with the race definitely gave it their all. Given that I only paid $45 for the half marathon, it felt like my money was fairly well spent, especially if I consider it more as an organized and glorified training run than a full-fledged race. One detriment to the race is it's located in Ventura, the same area as the Ventura Marathon (which runs on September 7th). Running two races so close geographically in less than two months might be overkill and I think people will lean more toward the larger race if they need to choose between the two.

Review of San Diego Holiday Half Marathon by chsfromca

First time in 2015, last time in 2015. Yes, it's a net downhill course and the medals are nice and there is lots of refreshments at the finish but the cons far outnumber the pros. 1. There is no race-day bib pickup. Why, I don't know. There are only 3,000 runners in this race. Race-day bib pickup could be accomplished for that many runners. 2. Because of #1, I paid $8 to have my bib sent to me in the mail. Evidently they didn't do it since it didn't arrive. I was told to go to Solutions tent to get a replacement. When arriving they only gave me a bib, no bag, shirt, etc. 3. Since I didn't get a bag at solutions, I had no bag for bag check. I had to go to the Chevron station to get a plastic bag for my gear. 4. The water stations are plentiful but highly disorganized and poorly staffed. The poor kids there were frantically trying to pour enough water in the cups to keep up. 5. Its not really very scenic except for the finish, Just running along a freeway for most of the way. 6. At the finish I was finally able to get my goodie bag and shirt but they were out of my size. Even though I specified Men's Medium on my entry form when i registered in April. Had to settle for a HUGE large shirt. 7. Since they gave me a replacement bib, I was not associated with my bib number in the results. I had to contact them to attach my information with the new bib number. They have since done this.

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