RaceGrader - Authentic Race Reviews - Swim, Bike, Run

RACE REVIEWS

Posted by: on December, 27 2011

Here is a sampling of some recent reviews published on RaceGrader.  We encourage past participants to share their race experiences to help other athletes prepare for upcoming events.  Tips on the course, where to park, the registration process, etc...can all be very helpful.  To write or read a review of a particular race, just type the name of the race into “Find A Race” on the right side of this page.  Keep Racing!

Review of A Run Through Redlands by fbekker

This is a well run local race (1/2 marathon): easy packet pick up, easy parking, well marked course with enough water stops. They claim the race is less hilly than previous years but it is still pretty challenging. My GPS tracked almost 700 feet of climb - most of it was during the first 7 miles. The course is scenic and mostly traffic free. The biggest complaint was that there was very little post-run food. It appeared there was only water and orange slices. Overall, pretty decent race.

Review of Long Beach International Marathon/Half/5K by kjensen16

I ran the Long Beach half last year and loved the course so I thought I would run my 1st full marathon this year here. Expo: The expo is great! Very well organized. They are ready to take on any problem that you might have as well. They were very quick getting our bibs and shirts to us. The shirts were not the best shirts that Long Beach has had. Really really really did not like that they were white, but the sea shell design on the side was nice. They were also shaped a bit odd. The official merchandise store had quite a large selection of stuff. Loved the hats this year. The expo itself was huge. It really does make OC's expo look funny. It is very spacious and has pretty much all the vendors that you could possibly want. Pre Race: The marathon does not have half as many people as the half marathon so everything is pretty easy for the pre race. It was quick to drop off our stuff at the UPS vans and there were plenty of port o johns with no lines at all. The runners village was pretty great too. It gave our group a great spot to set up camp. It was a great place for our group to meet up before and after the race. Course: The marathon starts off at 6am with the Voice of America's Marathons, Rudy Novotny! The course goes through parts of downtown Long Beach then goes up and over the bridge to the other side of the bay. Then you come back and run on the bike path on the beach. The marathon was not as packed as the half was last year on this part, but the bike path does get very crowded. I would not suggest running on the sand either. From the beach you head north through the neighborhoods as you make your way up to CSULB. There are some pretty interesting houses to look at. The crowd support was awesome! People were setting up aid stations right out of their own house. There were also people all over the place handing out bananas, oranges and candy. These were not people that were associated with the race themselves, just some amazing people cheering on the runners. The aid stations were great too. I believe there were 24 stations all together with one being about every mile or so. You leave the neighborhood streets for a bit when you get onto Atherton. From there you go through Cal Stat Long Beach. Lots of students out cheering you on! Then you start your way back. Running down Ocean was one of my favorite parts of this race (even though I drive it every day to work). It is a beautiful way to finish up a great race. Nice big houses on your right and the ocean on your left. The finish line is great with Rudy calling all the runners in. Post race: We were given the best medal I've ever gotten. Since this was the 30th anniversary it was a special seashell medal. I really love it. We were given a water and a bag full of snacks. We did not finish this race very quickly at all so there were no foil blankets by the time we got there, which I was bummed about. Not a big thing. The beer garden was alright. Just make sure you get over there before 1pm when it closes. Spectators: I had my family and friends that wanted to be out on the course for me. The best place that I found for spectators that want to view their runners more than once and not have to move around is right by the start/ finish line. They can send off their runner at the start line, walk across the grass and see their runner at about mile 6.5 (half and full). Then if they walk up shoreline drive a little bit they can see their runner cross the finish line. Other great spectator spots that would be reasonably easy to get to is up by Cal State Long Beach and over on 7th street by Blair field at recreation park. Overall a great race! I'll run at least the half next year for sure!

Review of Silverman 70.3 Ironman by RaceGrader

I can't give anything but straight "A"'s for this event. Ironman did a great job. PRE RACE: We made the decision to arrive on Friday to help avoid any stress. It was a great decision. We were able to check in around 6pm with no lines. That gave us the ability to be ahead of the crowds on Saturday. With this race, you are required to drop your run gear at T2 and bike at T1 the day before the race (although, you were able to access both transitions early on race day). Because we checked in Friday, we had our transitions set up my mid afternoon on Saturday and were able to relax the rest of the day. Ironman Village was a bit small but took place at the Henderson Pavillion. A great location for the finish line. RACE DAY: Ironman provided shuttles from T2 up to Lake Mead. We arrived around 5AM and did not have to wait in line. Because of the recent heat, there was a serious chance that wetsuits would not be allowed. But after measuring the temperature on race day at 75 degrees, wetsuits were declared legal for the event. A big relief for those that rely on the wetsuit for buoyancy! THE SWIM course was a basic triangle. Out, over, and back into the beach. There were numerous buoys for sighting and the water was clear. The most difficult part of the swim was the "convergence" of waves. It seemed like many people thought it was a bit crowded out there. Maybe they could move the waves to 4 minutes apart instead of 3? Also, it was tough to get a feel for the distance remaining on the swim back to the beach. I was sighting off a building on the beach that was at a much higher elevation than the water level. This gave the impression the beach was miles away. Not an event problem, but just something to consider for future athletes. Ironman did number the buoys. If I had known this, I would've been able to use them to determine how far was still remaining. Good reason to go to the pre-race meeting (I didn't attend). BIKE: Hills. I could pretty much stop right there. This bike course is brutally tough. There is very little relief from the climbs. I believe you climb over 4,200 feet with a net increase of nearly 2,700. Way more UP than DOWN. The bike course reminded me of the movie Ground Hog Day. Climb...climb...climb...down...climb...climb...climb...down...etc.. A good strategy is very important on this course. You can NOT just go out an hammer away at these hills. You'll have nothing left for the run (or the huge climb that awaits you at mile 54). It's very important to stay within your own pace and have a very good nutrition plan. Take a look at the number of people with DNF's for this event. I'm sure many of them were the people passing me as they powered up every hill. I would say this to summarize the bike course. First 10 miles are rolling hills (mostly climbing). The next 12 miles are very difficult. Basically all climbing with not much downhill relief. The next 12 miles are the reverse (these 12 miles are out and back). Although, the headwind made it difficult to really take full advantage of the net "downhill". At mile 42 there is a 2-3 mile climb. It's a serious grind from inside Lake Mead to the top of the hill by Lake Las Vegas entrance. From mile 42 to 52ish you are mostly down and flat. It seems like this is the time you'd make up some ground. But the race gods turned ugly and ruined those plans with a fairly decent headwind that taxed your legs even further. At mile 52 you encounter yet another big climb. I didn't hear much "chatter" on the course to that point. But when my fellow participants turned the corner to see this hill, many were cursing and calling for the course designers head! After climbing pretty much all day, you have to grind it out one last time from mile 52 pretty much all the way to the transition area. I finished the bike 45 minutes slower than my Half Ironman distance P.R. And I worked way harder! My bike time of 3:25 put me just above the 50 percentile in my age division. THE RUN: Did I mention it was hot? You don't really feel the heat until you put on those running shoes and started to go. Someone mentioned it may have reached 96 degrees in the afternoon. So again, nutrition is key! Fortunately Ironman did a great job with their aid stations. The course was a total of 3 loops and there were 4 aid stations. So 12 total chances to get "refreshed" on the 13.1 mile run. In most cases, loops tend to get a bit boring. But it's great for spectators. They can set up in the shade and see you run by the same point 6 times. The aid stations were fully stocked with ice (savior), water, propel, cola, chips, pretzels, oranges, banana's, gu's, etc.... it was basically a "much needed" buffet with enthusiastic volunteers. There were also a few "run through" mist systems on the course. And one was stationed with a guy hosing people down. That felt awesome!! Besides fighting the heat, this run course was HILLY. You think you had enough with the hills on the bike, but there really isn't any FLAT in Silverman. During the 4+mile loop, you go down 2 miles than up 2 miles. Repeat. Repeat. It's similar to running long intervals. If you grind out the "up" you can take advantage of the "down". Although with the demanding bike course and heat, I saw a ton of athletes walking or being sidelined with cramps/hamstring issues. POST RACE: Anyone that has done a long distance event knows you really feel brain dead after you cross the finish line. It's often times difficult to even function. Ironman had some great volunteers. As I crossed the line, someone became my personal escort. They took me to get my medal, remove my timing chip, grab my finishers hat, handed me an ice cold water, took me to get a finisher picture, then directed me to the athlete tent. It was a great service. Thank you to whoever you were helping me out! The athlete tent had a great setup with a full buffet of food and drinks. After cooling down, you pick up all your gear that was driven down by Ironman from Lake Mead. It was very organized and (again) staffed with great volunteers. Someone even had bagged my bike gear left on the ground at T2. First class all the way. OVERALL: I heard a few people saying this is the toughest course in America. Other's said they put out more effort on this course than they needed for a full Ironman. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but the course was more than just a challenge. It was VERY TOUGH. Proof were the number of people suffering on a course. But the with the great challenge, comes a great feeling of accomplishment. Knowing you can survive and finish an event like this gives you great confidence for any future challenges. Silverman was a great event and Ironman did a great job.

Review of Citrus Half Marathon by mrmao1

Enjoyed the race right up until I crossed the finish line. The organizers did not have enough finisher's medals even for the pre-registrants (I registered in August), were unkind (at best) the day of the race, and have not been very responsive - they have not provided any kinds of a time frame for when the medals might be delivered, despite multiple queries, just that they will be mailed later. Their overall attitude is disingenuous at best, condescending and evasive at worst.

Review of Rock N Roll Marathon/Half Marathon - Las Vegas by Scott Devine

RACE: Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon DATE: November 16, 2014 LOCATION: Las Vegas, NV DISTANCES: Marathon/Half Marathon/Half of Half Marathon/5K START TIME: 4:30pm WEATHER AT START: 51° and sunny... colder when the sun went down. FINISHERS: 25,172 (Half Marathon)/ 3208 (Full Marathon) "Viva Las Vegas" everyone! It was a busy night in "Sin City" as almost 30,000 runners shut down the famed Las Vegas strip, gambling that they could finish the latest running of the Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Marathon/Half Marathon. REGISTRATION/EXPO Registration fees for Rock 'n' Roll races are definitely on the high side and Las Vegas is one of their most expensive ones (guess it costs a lot to shut down the strip). Waiting until the last minute you can expect to spend over $150 for the half marathon. Fortunately, Rock 'n' Roll offers numerous discounts online (including $13 off of races each 13th of the month). And there is another option as you can sign up for the North American "TourPass" (unlimited Rock 'n' Roll races in the US for $449 in 2015). I registered for the Las Vegas race courtesy of the "TourPass 3-Pack" for $199. My 3-Pack also included the Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon (in July) and Rock 'n' Roll Los Angeles Half Marathon (in October). It's a pretty good deal, basically giving you 3 races for the price of 2. Unfortunately I can't comment on the race expo as I didn't arrive in Las Vegas until 2 hours before the race. From what I heard from other runners, the expo was fairly sizable and presented a good variety of vendors offering up their goods. I chose to pay for same day bib/shirt pick-up, which was available for an additional $40. That's a bit pricey for a basic service; clearly the high cost was designed to discourage everyone except for seriously "time crunched" runners. Since I had races on both Saturday and Sunday morning in CA, I had no option but to agree to pay the extra fee because runners had to pick up their own bibs (no sending friends/family in your stead). MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG The Rock 'n' Roll series typically has decent bling and shirts (the 2014 Rock 'n' Roll Los Angeles Half Marathon tech shirt was a miss) and they kept that "more good than bad" trend going in Vegas. Given that there is a "lil bit" of gambling going on in Las Vegas, it makes sense that the bling would celebrate our love of giving our hard earned money to the casinos. This year's medal featured an overlapping trio of playing cards: the 11 of clubs, 16 of hearts and 14 of spades, showing the date of the race (I'm waiting for some blackjack dealer to pull out the 14 of spades). The medal also featured a red ribbon and the various playing card suits (the full marathon had a black ribbon). And bonus, the medal also glows in the dark! The Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas race typically has black colored tech shirts and this year is no different. The shirt features the well-known "Welcome to Vegas" sign mashed-up with the race's "We Run The Night" slogan. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING For those traveling to Vegas you're visiting the land of taxis, so getting around shouldn't be a problem. If you drove to Vegas, odds are you parked at one of the casinos/hotels where you're staying. Parking should be free (don't worry, they'll get that back from you at the tables). Another option is to use the Vegas monorail (get yourself a day pass and you'll be fine). Or of course you could just hoof it along the strip (think of it as a warm-up). Be warned that the start line (Mandalay Bay) and the finish line (Mirage) are a bit of a ways apart, so be prepared to trek either before or after the race. I stayed at the Luxor, so I had quite the walk in the cold after the race. COURSE (HALF MARATHON) The Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon features a basically flat "modified out & back" course as runners make their way down the main strip. FYI, this is one of only two nights a year that the strip is closed to traffic (the other is New Year's Eve). Runners are gathered into 42 different corrals (a big field of racers) and start near the Mandalay Bay Hotel. Initially, runners head south to the outskirts of the city, hanging a U-turn shortly after the "Welcome to Las Vegas" sign (great photo op set up there). After that, runners basically head back up the strip past all of the popular casinos (MGM, Bellagio, Caesar's Palace, Treasure Island... just to name a few) as they make their way toward the older part of the town. I have to say that running down the main strip of Vegas is a pretty sweet experience (talk about sensory overload). And the throngs of cheering fans/"gamblers taking a break" make it even better. Around mile 7, runners leave the strip and weave through a bunch of nondescript Las Vegas side streets. This is definitely not the highlight of the race as the bright lights of the strip are temporarily gone and your only illumination comes from street lights and some temporary generators. The meandering backstreets eventually lead runners to Freemont Street, but unfortunately only the full marathon runners get to run down the famed boulevard. The half marathoners turn just shy of the street and instead make their way back to the strip. The final 3 miles retrace your route on the main Las Vegas strip, passing multiple casinos and hitting the finish line around the Mirage. SERVICES The Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Marathon had solid services before and during the race. They had a nice pre-race area, complete with live music to help runners get in the mood to pound the pavement (and an elevated VIP area for those who wanted to pay extra). Multiple water/Gatorade stops were situated along the route as well as plenty of medical tents/areas. And MarathonFoto was out in force snapping photos all along the way (and thank you for placing multiple photographers at the "Welcome to Vegas" sign). Mile markers were present on the course, although the only digital clocks were at the start and finish line (bring your GPS watch). And runner tracking was available for friends/family so they could leave the warm casinos (and slot machines) in time to cheer you on at the finish line. FINISH/POST PARTY The finish line area for the race was basically a cordoned-off chute along the Vegas strip. On the upside, runners were given a plethora of things upon completing the race... water, chocolate milk, Gatorade, Powerbar wafers, chips, fruit and the much needed mylar blankets given the dropping temperatures (I took two). Some plastic bags to carry the snacks might have helped, especially with runners sporting chilled fingers at this point. On the downside, given the huge number of runners, the chute felt increasingly cramped. Rather than dawdle, I grabbed my snacks and quickly made my way out of the finish area. There was a post party with live music, but to be honest I was simply too tired and cold to hang around and party. Instead, I made a beeline for my hotel and a much needed warm shower. RECOMMENDATION I've run the Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon twice before, in 2010 when it was still a morning race and again in 2011, the first year it was run at night (and an unorganized disaster). It seems that Rock 'n' Roll has fixed many of the shortcoming of that original nighttime race. The current incarnation of the half marathon/marathon is rather enjoyable. This is definitely one of the larger (and pricier) races you'll run with over 25,000 finishers in the half marathon alone. Nighttime races are not the norm and that novelty alone is enough reason to give the race a try. And if you're a fan of Vegas, this gives you another reason to check it out. Also, if you're one of those hardcore racers who want to to run two races in a single weekend... or even attempt two races in a single day (which I did)... this is a great destination. Viva Las Vegas... and Run on!

Review of REVEL Canyon City Marathon & Half by Scott Devine

RACE: REVEL Canyon City Half Marathon DATE: November 15, 2014 LOCATION: Azusa, CA DISTANCES: Half Marathon/Full Marathon START TIME: 7:00am WEATHER AT START: 54° Partly Cloudy (Half Marathon)/ 38° Partly Cloudy (Full Marathon) FINISHERS: 888 Half/ 625 Full Time to REVEL and to run! This was the inaugural running of the REVEL Canyon City Marathon/Half Marathon, the latest race in the new REVEL race series that also included REVEL Rockies (in July) and REVEL Big Cottonwood (in September). REGISTRATION/EXPO Registration costs for the REVEL Canyon City race start at a pretty wallet-friendly $79.95 for the half marathon and $99.95 for the full marathon (costs are basically the same across all of the REVEL races). Costs do go up as race day approaches, but you can save some additional cash with on-line discounts (check out Raceshed.com), or by becoming part of a team or allowing REVEL to post a few notices to your FB page. And given what the race offers, you’re getting some real bang for your buck. The expo for this year’s first running of the REVEL Canyon City race was held at the Double Tree hotel in Monrovia the day before the race. While the expo was only held on one day, the Friday before the race, the hours ran from 12:00pm- 8:00pm giving you time to hop over during lunch or after work. There wasn’t any race day bib/tech shirt pick-up (due to the time constraints and busing the morning of the race). However, friends and family were able to pick-up your stuff (provided they show a picture of your ID). The expo itself was modestly-sized, but had some vendors on-hand for you to pick up any needed race-day supplies. I volunteered on expo day, handing out bibs/swag bags (and had a lot of fun), and even during the busiest times, participants were able to get their gear within a few minutes. Oh, and the volunteers each got a pretty cool zip up sweatshirt, which is much better than the standard volunteer cotton T-shirt. MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG REVEL clearly has listened to runners’ wants and needs and this shows in their generous swag. The tech shirts for the race were in keeping with the style of the other races in the REVEL series, featuring an orange and light grey color scheme, emblazoned with the Canyon City emblem. There were gender specific shirts (so men and ladies both get individual designs). In addition, no dealing with the short-sleeve/long-sleeve dilemma. Runners had a choice at registration between the short sleeve design, or for an extra $5 they could opt for long sleeves. As for the medals, REVEL has done a great job with their bling. The race medal is an elegant brushed steel design (I’m a sucker for brushed steel) showing off the Canyon City emblem and also using negative space (cut out) to show the REVEL logo. The half marathon featured a blue ribbon (the half bib was also blue) while the full marathoners had an orange ribbon (same as their bib). It really was a great piece of bling. Like Big Cottonwood and Rockies, REVEL Canyon City also has some extra swag. In the swag bag, each runner received a pair of throwaway gloves and a mylar blanket to keep them warm on race morning. With temps on the mountain being rather cool in the morning, that was a welcome bit of swag. Race pictures are free (hear that other races) to all participants and REVEL will post them to your FB page as well. Given the $25- $30 cost most races charge for a single digital photo, this is one great perk. In addition, about two months after the race finishes, racers can expect to receive a short video montage of the race featuring some of their race photos (that they choose) and finisher stats included. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since the race begins way up in the San Gabriel Mountains of Angeles National Park, all racers must be bussed to the start line. Participants parked at the campus of Citrus College or near the finish line to catch a bus to take them up the mountain to the starting area. Parking was free and there were plenty of buses available for racers to make it up to the start line in time. NOTE: Spectators were not able to travel up the mountain, given that there was no parking available. Instead, fans were encouraged to cheer on their friends/family in the town of Azusa or near the finish line. COURSE (HALF MARATHON) The course for all of the REVEL races are “Point-to-Point” and feature significant decreases in elevation. The Canyon City half marathon course drops 900 feet during its 13.1 mile route, while the marathon course decreases a solid 5000 feet during the course of the race. It’s the biggest decline of any full marathon race in North America that also is a BQ (Boston Qualifier). If you’re looking for a PR or a time to qualify for the Boston Marathon, this is a great race to try. There are a few uphill sections on this race, but they aren’t very steep and not too long in duration. You’ll spend the vast majority of the race motoring downhill. NOTE: Downhill races can impact your body (especially your quads) differently than flat courses. I ran the half marathon course, which starts at the 13.1 mile mark of the marathon course (other reviews are available to discuss the full course). The half marathon course starts 12 miles up on Highway 39 and makes its way down the mountains into the town of Azusa. If you’re looking for a nice “get back to nature” course, then you’ll like the Canyon City route. Just as the REVEL Rockies and Big Cottonwood races showed off the natural beauty of their surrounding, Canyon City gives you a glimpse at the Angeles National Park and some nice mountainous vistas. Now this doesn’t mean you’re completely out in the wild as the race does run by a few manmade dams, which are fairly impressive in their own right. The downhill nature of the course allows you the chance to go at a faster pace than normal, so enjoy the slope. The course also does wind, so runners should be wary of running tangents (hugging the turns) to make sure they don’t add unnecessary distance to their race. One other note is that runners are expected to stay on one side of the road as this is the only access to the top of the mountain. Police escorts brought a few cars/service vehicles up the course on occasion. It only happened a few times and runners had plenty of time to make certain they were on the proper side of the street. Once runners reach the bottom of the canyon, they’ll empty out into the town of Azusa for the last two miles. The race itself ends near Azusa Pacific University amidst the cheers of the gathered locals. SERVICES Services on the course are pretty solid… and actually quite good given the fact that everything (supplies, volunteers, power) needed to be brought up the mountain by truck. I continue to be impressed by the “person to porta-potty ratio” at the start of the races, knowing that each one had to traverse a windy mountain road. The course had several water/energy drink stops along the way with a decent amount of volunteers handing out cups. Runners who drink a lot, however, might want to consider bringing a small water bottle with them to tide them over between water stops. Other stops had PowerGel, fruit and candy. There were also medical tents sprinkled along the course. As for mile markers, they were present on the course (one or two did fall over) but given that there was no power available in the wilderness, no digital clocks were present. Runner who wanted to keep track of their time should bring their iPhones or GPS devices. Runner tracking was also available for runners as well as their friends and family. FINISH/POST PARTY Just like with their runner’s swag, REVEL knows how to treat runners after a race. Sure there were plenty of standard snacks after the race… chips, drinks and such. But REVEL also likes to give runners some unexpected (even unorthodox) treats. Just as Big Cottonwood offered pizza and soda (of which I partook generously), Canyon City offered its own unique snacks. Chick-Fil-A offered runners chicken nuggets (I inhaled a few of them) and Marie Calendar’s presented pieces of pie to finishers (talk about some unique carbo loading). One other cool bit of swag fairly unique to REVEL is right after the race, each runner can get a card printed out showing off their race stats (a nice little souvenir for the ride home). RECOMMENDATION NOTE: I am one of the REVEL Race Ambassadors and my registration fee for Canyon City was covered by REVEL. Inaugural races usually have some kind of problem: running out of water, unexpected delays, course problems or some other snafu (which we all typically forgive). Happily, I didn’t find any significant shortcomings at all with REVEL Canyon City. The race officials clearly did their due diligence and put on a fun race. Given that Canyon City is limited to a set number of runners (about 1000 for the half marathon and 700 for the full), it has the benefit of not being an overly-complicated affair like many of the larger races (much less stressful for runners). In addition, it also allows them the opportunity to provide perks not typically seen at larger races. I had a real fun time running REVEL Canyon City. I plan for it to be an annual addition to my race schedule. Run on!

Review of Orange County Turkey Trot by jeffcar1

Used to run the Dana Point race up until a few years ago, as it just got way too large. Parking, and logistics make for a long day for Thanksgiving. When I heard about this one, so close to home, smaller field, and less expensive, I decided to give it a try. For an inaugural race, it was put on very well, sure it started late, mainly due to a lot of people who just showed up because they couldn't get into the larger race down south. Even with the late start though, I was still able to get home far earlier than if I had done Dana Point. The course was flat and fast, great tee-shirts, medals, pie and other freebies after the race. I will definitely be back next year and I am sure they will be more than ready for an even larger field next year.

Review of Veterans Day Run - San Diego by mariemadeline

This race was by far the most unorganized race I have ever done. I participated in the race on November 8, 2014, but this listing if for last year's run. They did not give clear driving directions, and there was not enough parking for the runners. The post race was very lacking and the race crew was not very helpful when asked any questions. They advertised that the race was chip timed, and I had asked if there was a time limit, but they told me there wasn't. They did, however, stop recording race times at 45 minutes, even though there were still some participants that had not completed the race, and I was one of those participants. I e-mailed and messaged for 4 days, but received no response of any kind. I will never participate in a race organized by Race Operations, Inc., also known as Heavenly Racing. This company has an F rating at the BBB for not responding to any complaints. Stay away!

Review of Orange County Turkey Trot by chspensley

I have run a Thanksgiving Day race every year for as long as I can remember with varying experiences. This race was once of the best. I ran Dana Point the last three years and enjoyed the event but the race almost becomes an all day affair with all of the events and the number of participants. I was looking for an alternative race and I found one in this gem of a race. Parking was plentiful ($5) but at least you knew you could park relatively near the start line. Pre race was solid until the very willing and helpful staff was overwhelmed by the vast number of last minute registrations. Because it was the first year of the event I am certain they were surprised as the number of participants doubled and hour before it started. All that considered and with a keen eye on the charity the race supports I think the fact that they didn't turn anyone away was amazing. I am certain there will be cut offs next year but I think the desire for a good alternative to the mass crowds at Dana Point will sell this one out quickly. Easily the best shirt I have received this year, also the friendliest staff. The pumpkin pie was also a very nice touch. I have read the previous reviews and found a few pans to be a little unfair to this event as it was only it's first year - This event was only hindered by minor logistics. The race was fast and fun and the swag was wayyy superior to Dana Point for a lot less $$.

Review of Santa To The Sea Half Marathon by Scott Devine

RACE: Santa To the Sea Half Marathon DATE: December 14, 2014 LOCATION: Oxnard, CA DISTANCES: Half Marathon/5K/1K Kids Run/Diaper Dash START TIME: 8:00am (Half Marathon) WEATHER AT START: 51° and sunny FINISHERS: 1,878 (Half Marathon)/ 736 (5K) 'Tis the season to be sweaty, Fa la la la la... la la la la. This past Sunday the north pole came to Oxnard as a gaggle of runners showed off their holiday spirit (and a whole bunch of wacky holiday costumes too) as they trekked from the 101 highway down to the ocean in the 7th running of the Santa to The Sea Half Marathon. REGISTRATION/EXPO Costs for this Santa-centric race are quite reasonable as they start at $55 for early comers, climbing throughout the year, maxing out at $95 just before race weekend. And the race does run specials/discounts throughout the year, so your inner Scrooge can smile as you'll be sure to save a few dollars off registration fees. As for the expo/bib/shirt pick-up, the race offered several options. You could do the traditional "day before race" expo in Oxnard. Another option was to do VIP pick-up on race morning for an extra $20. For those of us in LA who didn't feel like driving all the way to Oxnard two days in a row, the race organizers also had an early pick-up the week before in Santa Monica (a tradition I hope they continue). I, however, chose the final option which was to pay $6 to have my bib/timing chip mailed to me. I would get my race tech shirt at the finish line. Unfortunately, this turned out to be a bit of a problem as after the race I was told they were out of men's shirts (grrr). But like Santa coming to the rescue, I met with the race director who took my info and said he would get a shirt mailed to me asap. MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG The swag for the race was pretty standard fare, meaning a finisher's medal and race tech shirt. One nice twist is that the organizers let the runners vote (via Facebook) on various aspects of the bling. We got to decide on the color scheme of the medal as well as the ribbon design. As for the shirt, runners got to pick the color and short sleeved vs. long sleeved. The votes were tallied and the winning designs chosen. This year's medal featured Santa chugging along, lugging the number "7" on his shoulder along with a green border surrounding him. The ribbon was a holiday themed green and red sash, complete with images of presents, ornaments and the race's name. Not the most subtle or elegant medal you'll ever receive, but it definitely radiated the holiday spirit. The 2014 race shirt was a deep green color with white stripes on the side and featured the race's logo on the chest. The shirts were long-sleeved and they had crew neck versions for the "lords a' leaping" and V-necks for the "maids a' milking." As race shirts go, it was a pretty decent design and again kept with the holiday theme. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Transportation to the half marathon was pretty straightforward. Drive on the 101 highway until you get to "The Collection" shopping center in Oxnard where you park and catch a quick bus ride to the starting area. People running the 2nd leg of the half marathon relay took another shuttle from the start line to the midway point of the race. After the race, runners caught another bus back to the parking area. Parking is free at "The Collection" and the whole operation went pretty smoothly. COURSE (HALF MARATHON) The Santa To The Sea Half Marathon features a "point to point" course... hence the "to the sea" part. You start at the big "Santa" located at Nyeland Acres (right by the 101) and meander your way down through the city of Oxnard until you get to the ocean (find yourself standing in waves and you've gone too far). The route is flat (with the exception of a freeway overpass or two) with twists and turns along industrial parks and neighborhoods making your way to the coast. Once you hit mile 11, you run along a seaside bike path for a mile or so before finishing near the harbor. Two things of note on the course: first off, at times you're sharing the road with cars (runners have one side of the road). The course does intersect several sizable intersections with cars waiting to cross. Police and volunteers were on hand directing traffic and holding cars. But on more than one occasion I felt a little uneasy that an impatient motorist was going to try and "thread the needle" and jump the gun. Secondly, on some stretches of road the pavement was a bit beat up (lots of cracks/potholes). Runners need to be extra alert to make certain they don't step on a crack and potentially twist an ankle (or break their mother's back). SERVICES Kudos to the over 500 volunteers who helped out with the Santa to the Sea Half Marathon (many of whom I saw handing out water). The services for the race were in keeping with its size and fairly basic. The course was dotted with water stops (and some energy drink) and Gu's were given out at one stop near the end. Since it's impractical to think a race of this size would be packed start to finish with fans, the race opted to create "cheer zones" along the course where locals gathered to give runners a nice motivation boost. I enjoyed running through each of the zones, high-fiving kids along the way. Given the meandering nature of the course, I was wondering early on if there would be enough signage out there to give runners sufficient heads up on which way to go. I definitely went with a lemming-inspired "follow the person in front of you" strategy. And while mile markers were present on the course, be sure to bring a GPS watch if you want to know your time. FINISH/POST PARTY The Santa To The Sea Half Marathon did have a pretty good finish line area. After receiving their medals, runners were treated to a few drinks, fruit and snacks (I appreciated the homemade cookies). Runners could also visit the tented area to check out the race expo one last time. Spectators were also able to see many of the presents donated by the runners. NOTE: One really great aspect of the race was that each runner was asked to bring an unwrapped toy to give to local charities. As I approached the start line amidst the sea of Santas, almost every runner I saw was bringing toys or goods to donate. Well done runners! One other nice addition at the finish line was the race basically emptied out into the area for the local farmer's market. So be sure to tuck an extra $20 in your running belt if you want to pick up some good home grown produce and local prepared food. Oh, and since the shuttle after the race dropped you right back at The Collection, you have the chance to do some quick shopping or grab a bite to eat (provided you're not too sweaty or too tired to walk). RECOMMENDATION I enjoy "holiday themed" races and the chance to break out goofy headgear (I opted with Santas on springs this year). Last year I ran the Holiday Half Marathon in Pomona, so it's hard not to think of Santa To The Sea without comparing the two. In their defense, I'll say each race has its strengths as well as areas where they could improve. But both are small town races, so you tend to be more forgiving with shortcomings as well as wanting to support the local running community. I'm glad I ran the Santa To the Sea Half Marathon. From the runners donating gifts, to the people decked out in costumes and the locals supporters cheering on friends and family (and strangers), I think the race succeeded in capturing the spirit of the season.

Review of MK5K & 10K Run/Walk by lipservice

This is a fun race for the entire family and the proceeds go to a GREAT cause!!!! It's a MUST Attend!

Review of Los Angeles Marathon by Scott Devine

RACE: Asics 2015 Los Angeles Marathon DATE: March 15th, 2015 DISTANCES: Marathon (Sunday)/5K (Saturday) LOCATION: Los Angeles, CA START TIME: 6:55am (moved up from 7:25am) WEATHER AT START: 69° and hot. FINISHERS: 21,589 (12,569 Men/9,389 Women) (Updated from 2014 Review) Hot! Hot! Hot! Mother nature seemed to take the spotlight at the 30th running of the Los Angeles Marathon. The 2014 race was one of the warmest on record and this year’s edition seemed hellbent on breaking that mark. A week before the race, the 26,000 participants learned the awful truth. We were going to apparently be running a marathon on the surface of the sun. As a result, the focus of the race race became more about “the experience” than going for fast times. And big kudos to the race officials for taking steps to minimize the heat’s impact. For starters they sent out numerous e-mails telling runners about the impending heat and how to best prepare. In addition, they increased the course support (improved water stops) and even moved the start of the race up 30 minutes in order for runners to get a few miles in before the heat hit. I have a feeling the marathon start time will permanently shift earlier. As it turns out, some lingering cloud cover helped shave a few degrees off of the temperatures, but it was still one of the hottest races I’ve ever run. And now the rest of the info… REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registration costs for the LA Marathon are pretty standard for a big city race. And since the race sold out again this year (about a week before race day), it’s wise to purchase your spot early, lest you be relegated to being a spectator. Packet pick-up for the race was at the marathon expo located at the LA Convention Center. The LA Marathon has one of the better expos out there and it’s worth stopping by to check out the vendor wares and freebies. One little tip, rather than shelling out $15 for expo parking or similar costs at one of the nearby lots, just drive 3-4 blocks away and you can find ample meter parking (more cash for race souvenirs). TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since the LA course is a point-to-point race, parking/transportation is a little complicated. Racers have the option of being dropped off or parking at Dodger Stadium (traffic can get a little crazy as the start time approaches; get there early). The other option (and better option in my opinion) is to park in Santa Monica and take one of the race shuttles/buses to the start line at Dodger Stadium. You can pay for a parking spot ahead of time (which is a good idea) and it will set you back $20, but the shuttle is free for all runners and it’s a pretty painless process. Although, be warned that the shuttles tend to run “early early” in the morning in order to guarantee you getting to the starting line with plenty of time to spare. I had a 4:30 am shuttle that got me to Dodger Stadium at 5:00am and ample time to relax (and then get anxious for the race to start). T-SHIRT/MEDALS For swag fans, the 2015 LA Marathon T-shirt featured a black shirt with light blue side panels and featured a retro “LA 30″ design on the front. It’s a more subdued look than last year’s shirt and it worked for me. As for the medal, this year’s design displayed a big “30” logo in metallic blue with the cityscape and finisher ribbon beneath it. A nice piece of bling to add to the collection. COURSE Back in 2010, the LA Marathon ditched its downtown course in favor of a point-to-point “Stadium to the Sea” path and it has transformed an average marathon into a destination race. It truly is a spectacular route that hits numerous LA Landmarks. Starting at Dodger Stadium, the course travels through Chinatown and parts of downtown before heading up into Hollywood and past the Chinese Theater. Then you head down Sunset Blvd and into West Hollywood before a jaunt along Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills and a turn toward the ocean. A quick run through the VA Hospital grounds (seemingly the toughest and least attractive part of the course) follows and then heads out onto San Vicente Blvd along residential streets before a final left at Ocean Blvd. The last mile of the course is run along the ocean and ends just a few blocks away from the Santa Monica Pier. It truly is a magnificent course that shows the heart of The City of Angels. COURSE SERVICES As mentioned before this year’s race was run in extreme heat and as a result the race’s already solid course support was improved even more. Water/Gatorade stops were at every mile (although they got a little less organized in the last few miles of the race). Cliff also was on the course, providing gels at various stops for runners. Medical personnel were even more present this year and I saw several of them tending to any downed runners along the course. The biggest shout out though has to go to the fans. Knowing that this was going to be a challenging race because of the heat, the citizens of LA turned out in force. And they all seemed to be carrying goodies. From water (in cups and squirt guns), to ice, to fruit and salty snacks, the fans and charity groups showed the runners just how much they love the marathon. One runner I passed told me he’d never seen so much ice in his entire life. I think I speak for all of the 26,000 participants when I say “Thank you LA for your love and support.” FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY The finish line for the LA Marathon was what you’d expect for a large race. After you received your medal, you were given a Mylar blanket (aluminum side out to reflect the heat as opposed to keeping it in) and access to various snacks and water. An incredible post race treat was the small hand towels soaked in cold water and available to each runner. After surviving a 26.2 mile run in a virtual sauna, being handed an ice-cold towel is an absolute slice of heaven. One little picky note is that racers could really benefit from bags to hold their post-race snacks. I know for a fact that my dexterity was totally off and holding three different bags of snacks and a bottle of water was a virtual impossibility (I again used my hat as a makeshift sack). I will say the final walk to exit the “secure area” was really long (or maybe I was just really tired). There were plenty of other amenities available such as “cooling buses” for overheated runners. And if you didn’t feel like hanging around the course once you have your medal in hand, the 3rd Street Promenade and beach were just a stone’s throw away (but please don’t throw stones, you might hit a runner or spectator). RECOMMENDATION Put simply, when I think of what a high-profile marathon should be, Los Angeles now comes to mind. With its wonderfully scenic “LA” course, fantastic fan support and other amenities, the LA Marathon deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as many of the other established A-list races. This is another race I’m more than a bit biased toward (it was my very first marathon), but it has been a near annual tradition for me since I first ran it back in 2009 and will remain on my “to run” list for every year to come. NOTE: Next year’s LA Marathon will be run a month earlier (Feb. 14th, 2016) in order to coincide with the Olympic Marathon Trials.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Palos Verdes Half Marathon by happyrunnerstanley

It was a great race! The Parking was easy and well communicated. I jumped right on the shuttle and made it to the course. I wish i could have done packet pick up at Road Runner, but did it onsite. They had bib only pickup in the morning, which i guess was because they had a short time to get everyone through and start on time. i ran the 10k, so we started with the 1/2. they had a drone flying around shooting video, so that got everyone to cheer before starting. The course was well marked and there seemed to be plenty of volunteers, they were all cheering us on as we came by. the aid stations were well stocked. i only drank water, but they had Clif blocks and drinks. After the race we all got a cool medal. It is really heavy, i imagine they spent alot on them. also got some trail mix and a Fiji water. There were tons of sponsors in the expo and we got a free brunch (i got the quiche, which was really tasty - good to get some protein). Typically i take off right after a race, but it was so beautiful and lots of people were hanging out, so i stayed and had a beer - Sierra Nevada (it too came for free with the race). I got my shirt and re-usable bag and got a picture at the photobooth. I left around 11am and the shuttle took me right back to the lot where i had parked. Overall, i was really impressed with this race and would definitely do it again. I am not a big reviewer of things, but just thought this experience merited it.

Review of Temecula Wine Country Half Marathon by ashleyspotts

This was my first half marathon, and the experience could not have been better. The t shirt was lovely & the swag good. The whole course was stunning beyond words. Hot air balloons rose as we began. The mayor spoke at the start which was really, really neat. The pacers were on target & so helpful. The course was lovely. It was easy enough for a beginner, but still with hills for some challenge. We passed all sorts of beautiful homes, yards, vineyards, & many animals! It was quiet & peaceful. Weather was very nice for that time of year. It was well supported with aid stations, first aid, & porta potties. It was a moderate crowd which was nice. We weren't running over eachother, but it was well loved. Looking back after having done a few half's now, people seemed so generally happy to be at the race. It was mostly women...Maybe that's why. There was a neat comradery. Post race was nice. The complimentary wine & glass was awesome! There was band & some good booths. Only thing that was not great was the shuttle service back from the race. We waited forever & it was not clear where we were being picked up. Would HIGHLY recommend.

Review of Lake Forest Chamber 5K Elf Yourself by drecio01

Super fun and festive, family friendly! A great community event with great after race expo. Lots of good giveaways and food!

Review of Great Donut Run by mikeerlanson

This race was fantastic! It was well put together and extremely well supported by volunteers, traffic management, parking, vendor support and volunteers. I was even more surprised that this race was so fun and well done being an inaugural event! The course was flat, fast and fun and the donut challenge was great! I ssssoooo can't wait for the next one, it was an absolute blast! The best part of all is that they are dog friendly too. And I can't forget the costumes! There were a ton of spectacular costumes that were absolutely hilarious!

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Palos Verdes Half Marathon by seanrunsit

Starting out, getting registered looked like a nightmare as we walked over to the tents. However, once we got there, it became apparent that the volunteers were ready to get us in and out as efficiently as possible. Since there were also groups for the 5k and 10k, we were organized accordingly and made plans to pick up my shirt and bag after the race. At first this seemed annoying, but as my friend and I walked over to the course, we realized we really didn't want to deal with either of those things anyway, until after the race. The course itself was nice. Beautiful views and hills, which we knew going in from a few years prior. Glad to see that it kept most of the pleasantries of the old half in PV, while adding a few new twists and turns. After, the food was good and the expo hub was nice. Some of the exhibitors seemed a little questionable, but overall there were lots of people hanging out, drinking free Sierra Nevada beer, and eating the brunch (surprisingly pretty tasty!). Overall, I would definitely run this race again. Lots of amenities and it was easy. When things are easy I'm on board 100%.

Review of Newport Mesa Spirit Run by cheyneinman

This race has a lot of moving parts, and I thought it was executed perfectly. It offers more excitement than your traditional local 5k and for a great price. I really liked the course and the prizes were amazing. I will definitely be back next year.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Ventura by Scott Devine

RACE: Lexus LaceUp Ventura DATE: October 24, 2015 DISTANCES: Half Marathon/10K/5K LOCATION: Ventura, CA  (Shoreline Park) START TIME: • 7:00 am Half/10K • 7:45 am 5K WEATHER AT START: 61 degrees Welcome to the second stop on the Lexus LaceUp 2015 race series. After an enjoyable jaunt last week in Irvine, the LaceUp crew found themselves gathering pre-dawn (daylight savings ends next week) at Promenade Park overlooking the ocean in scenic Ventura. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP The entire Lexus LaceUp series offers very reasonable registration rates. For Ventura, the “earilest bird” rates started low ($25 for 5K, $45 for 10K, $70 for the half marathon) and increased as race day approached. But even for the latest of comers, the rates never got too high ($40 for 5K, $60 for 10K and $85 for the half marathon). On top of that, Lexus LaceUp offered plenty of online discounts (and some really nice ones too) so in the end the rates were quite light on the bank account. LaceUp Ventura offered packet pick-up the two days before the race at a local Roadrunner store (yours truly was there on Friday lending a hand to the crew), but also allowed same day pick-up (at no additional charge). TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Racers driving to Promenade Park had plenty of easy parking available at the Ventura Fairgrounds. The cost for parking was $5, which is rather reasonable given what some other races charge for parking at their races (talking to you Disney). T-SHIRT/MEDALS/SWAG For people running other races in the LaceUp series, the swag was familiar. The tech shirt was similar to the one given at Irvine, but the race location “Ventura” was printed on the sleeve. Racers also got another reusable shopping bag to carry their swag (I look forward to hitting Trader Joe’s with mine). Racers also received the cool “honeycomb” shaped finisher’s medal. The ribbon (green for 5K, blue for 10K and white for the half marathon) also listed the Ventura location on it. The race also served as another notch for those trying to achieve special challenge medals. Those people who run all 4 Lexus LaceUp races (Irvine, Ventura, Palos Verdes & Riverside) will earn a special “LaceUp Challenge” medal. And those people who ran the Ventura Marathon (back on Sep. 13th), LaceUp Ventura this past weekend and the upcoming Santa Barbara Half (Nov. 7th) will earn the special “805 Challenge” medal. Bring on the bling. And Runner Buzz was once again on hand, providing runners with free digital photos of the race. COURSE For LaceUp Ventura, each of the races shared common start and finish locations, as well as sharing parts of their courses. The 5K and 10K races utilized a loop course that began at Promenade Park and headed down the coast on surface streets before looping around and heading back up along the water. I ran the half marathon, which utilized a good chunk of the 10K course before continuing up (running parallel to the beach) along the oceanside bike path. The course then turned inland, utilizing a lengthy “out and back” route that followed the bike path, turning around at mile 8. We did cross a few streets during the course of the race, but police were present to ensure that traffic stopped to give the right-of-way to runners. According to the elevation charts, the half marathon course featured a slight upgrade as we headed inland (gaining about 120′ over three miles) and then back down after the turnaround. To be honest, I hardly noticed any incline, but after the turnaround I convinced myself mentally that I was indeed running downhill (a little bit of a “placebo” effect). Those people who have run other races in Ventura will definitely remember parts of the course, but who is going to complain about running near the ocean (a nice view). COURSE SERVICES The course services for the LaceUp Ventura were in keeping with those at the Irvine race. “Arrow” signs and volunteers were present at key points along the course to make sure that runners stayed on course. Water/electrolyte stops were present about every 2 miles (they served double duty on the out and back portions) with volunteers to make sure we stayed hydrated and to give some encouragement. Mile markers were present along the course but not digital timers except for at the finish line. Once again runners had B-tags on their bibs, which provided race results and info. People could also utilize the mobile “LaceUp app” for information about the race. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY The finish line services and post party were reminiscent of the Irvine race, as runners got their medals, snacks and then could check out a few vendors (including the Lexus display) or get a complimentary massage. As for me, I made my way right to the food trucks and their free grub for runners. This time around I chose a spicy chicken quesadilla and washed it down at the beer garden with another brew provided by Sierra Nevada. RECOMMENDATION This was another enjoyable race in the Lexus LaceUp series (for the record, I am one of the Lexus LaceUp ambassadors). While these races don’t feature some of the polish or flash of the bigger (and more costly) races, these are intimate and informal affairs and worth the effort of waking up early and pounding some pavement.

Review of Orange County Turkey Trot by lunasea

Fun, fast, flat course. Great swag => nice tech shirt instead of cotton. Easy parking. Sure, they've got a little work to do pre-race, but they know what's needed (point the speakers so the queued up runners can hear the announcements) and they got buried this first year with walk-ups. I'll be back next year.

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