RaceGrader - Authentic Race Reviews - Swim, Bike, Run

RACE REVIEWS

Posted by: on December, 27 2011

Here is a sampling of some recent reviews published on RaceGrader.  We encourage past participants to share their race experiences to help other athletes prepare for upcoming events.  Tips on the course, where to park, the registration process, etc...can all be very helpful.  To write or read a review of a particular race, just type the name of the race into “Find A Race” on the right side of this page.  Keep Racing!

Review of Mammoth Half Marathon by

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED AS A DESTINATION RACE. Well-organized professional race but comes with the Eastern Sierras as your playground too. This year we came up earlier from San Francisco and stayed longer after . Definitely a photographers vacation spot. We Did some trail hiking (Ansel Adams Wilderness, Devil's Postpile and the Pacific Crest Trail) and a photo excursion day to Bodie a CA historical Park about 10 miles from Lee Vining and Mono Lake -- just north of Mammoth on 395. In Yosemite on the Tioga Pass road, stopped at Saddlebag Lake and Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite for a photo hikes as well. The 2014 Half course was even better IMHO -- by adding a Lake Mary Loop at about mile 2 ; instead of 6 miles straight down hill, you run around the edge of a clear mountain lake. Gave my quads a breather. I still had to walk -- I chose the 7 mile marker to actually walk backwards for about 100 steps. I walked some of that slightly uphill mile 12 that seems like to should be so easy but is NOT somehow ....walked but took in the vistas of the mountains. The support was fabulous all along the course, even for the back of the pack. The start included foil insulating wraps --- excellent idea because the elevation combined with early morning hour was cool, but the temps were climbing this year. Well- done Mammoth folks!

Review of MK5K & 10K Run/Walk by lipservice

This is a fun race for the entire family and the proceeds go to a GREAT cause!!!! It's a MUST Attend!

Review of Great Donut Run by hubba79

Where else can you run and eat donuts!! Great run for the whole family!! Definitely a good time.

Review of A Run Through Redlands by fbekker

This is a well run local race (1/2 marathon): easy packet pick up, easy parking, well marked course with enough water stops. They claim the race is less hilly than previous years but it is still pretty challenging. My GPS tracked almost 700 feet of climb - most of it was during the first 7 miles. The course is scenic and mostly traffic free. The biggest complaint was that there was very little post-run food. It appeared there was only water and orange slices. Overall, pretty decent race.

Review of Star Wars Half Marathon by Scott Devine

RACE: Star Wars Half Marathon DATE: January 18, 2015 LOCATION: Anaheim, CA DISTANCES: Half Marathon/10K/5K/Kids Run START TIME: 5:30am WEATHER AT START: 52° and mostly sunny. FINISHERS: 10374 Half Marathon (Sunday)/ 9195 10K (Saturday) A long time ago (okay, it was early Sunday morning) in a galaxy far far away (aka Anaheim)... Half marathon runners were out in full "force" (sorry, been stuck on Star Wars puns all week) for the inaugural running of the Star Wars Half Marathon. When you combine my childhood obsession with Star Wars (I had every Star Wars toy, including Star Wars bed sheets) and my adult obsession of distance running into one event you get something that excites both the big kid and the eternal 8-year-old inside me. REGISTRATION/EXPO Over the years I've spent countless amounts of disposable (and non-disposable) income on Star Wars toys/collectables/memorabilia. Heck my mom once joked that if they sold tauntaun poop I'd want some (I would have). So, this was one race I was willing to spend whatever was necessary. And a good thing too because Disney race costs are really "out of this world" (sorry). Granted it wasn't quite as much as the 17,000 that Luke and Ben Kenobi paid for a one-way trip on the Millenium Falcon to Alderaan, but $195 ($208 once you pay the additional "whatever" fees) is a steep amount of republic credits to part with for a half marathon. Now in addition to the Half Marathon, runners could sign up for the 10K or spend extra and do both the 10K on Saturday and Half Marathon on Sunday (dubbed "The Rebel Challenge"). As for the expo, like the Disneyland Half Marathon and Avengers race before it, the Star Wars Half Marathon expo was held at the Disneyland Hotel (Thu- Sat). Parking at the Disneyland Hotel is typically $17, but costs were waived for 30 whole minutes (not enough time to get your stuff to be honest). Now, I have a feeling that they weren't enforcing that policy but if you want to play it safe, my advice would be to park at Downtown Disney where you get a 3-hour grace period. And that can be stretched to 5 hours of free parking with purchase/validation at one of the sit down restaurants. They do enough races at Disney that the expo runs like a fairly well oiled machine (or should I say like C-3PO getting an oil bath that feels so good). You get your bib in a dressed-up subterranean portion of the parking structure and then head up to the hotel for your shirt and gear bag. The expo had a decent amount of vendors showing off their latest wares, and if you stopped by the PRO Compression booth on Saturday you could have said "hi" to yours truly. NOTE: Runners had to pick up their own bibs; no exceptions. Disney races do have one additional component unlike other marathons/half marathons. People go nuts for the Disney gear. In fact people line up for hours for the chance to pay premium prices (okay, over premium prices) for the jackets/shirts/hats/pins/toys/whatever Disney is selling. In the past hoarders have bought up all of the merchandise on the first day (to turnaround and sell for profit on e-bay) leaving us latecomers souvenir-less. Things were a little better this year as they restocked the shelves somewhat each day. Unfortunately, the one item I wanted, a "Star Wars Half Marathon" pint glass, was long gone when I showed up on Saturday at noon. MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG If you've run a Disney race before, you know that they love their bling big and shiny. When I first saw the Star Wars Half Marathon medal I have to say I was a bit bummed. It seemed very muted. But then it hit me and I realized its utter genius. The medal was basically a replica of the one given to Luke and Han by Princess Leia after they destroyed the first Death Star. Okay, that's pretty friggin' awesome (my inner geek was smiling). Oh, and the ribbon on the medal was brown with text and featured a pattern that kind of looked like Chewie's fur (did you ever notice that in Star Wars he didn't get a medal... no wonder he roared at the end). The medals for the other races, including the Rebel Challenge were fun bits of bling and lived up to Disney's usual standard. As for the shirt, I have to say I was a little disappointed with it... not because it's a bad shirt (a long sleeve grey Champion shirt with Chewbacca on it). Not at all. But it's more like one of those "other" shirts you tend to buy at races in addition to the free race tech shirt. And given the home run done with the medal, Disney missed an opportunity here. Hoping they improve on it for next year. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Disney offers you several choices when it comes to transportation/parking for their races. If you stay overnight at most local hotels, be prepared to see an additional parking fee on your bill. And most will provide some sort of shuttle service to get you to the starting area. But if you were like me and made the hyperspace trek down to Disney in the very very a.m., be prepared to part with $17 to park in one of the Disneyland structures. COURSE This was the third Disney half marathon I've run in the last 5 months and I was curious to see if the course was going to be something new or a rehash of Disneyland (in Aug) or Avengers Superheroes (in Nov). And happily it did feature some new twists and turns. On the upside, it was a better course than the Disneyland half. On the downside, it wasn't as good as the course for the Avengers race. The course for Star Wars had elements of both a looping and an out-and-back route. As with all of the Disneyland-related half marathons, the race started (and ended) near the Disneyland Hotel. Runners quickly made their way toward Disneyland park, including running through multiple "behind-the-scenes" areas. At 1.75 miles you made your way into the actual park for a run around various popular areas including Fantasyland, Main Street U.S.A., Frontierland and Tomorrowland (of course) before exiting the park and then running all through California Adventure. Star Wars characters were present should you want to catch a snapshot with Boba Fett or some stormtroopers. By 3.75 miles, however, your jaunt through the "happiest places on earth" was done. The rest of the race took you away from Disney, down a few main city streets and around various residential Anaheim neighborhoods before heading back toward Disney in the last few miles and concluding at the Disneyland Hotel. Those expecting another run through Angel Stadium (as in several other Disney races) were in for a bit of a shock as it was absent from this course. I'm not familiar with the neighborhoods around Disneyland, so this was quite a bit of new (if unremarkable) territory for me. As is the story with all of the Disneyland halfs, the course is very anti-climactic. Once you leave the parks by mile 4 (which are a lot of fun to run through), the rest of the course is really like any other city race and honestly quite average. SERVICES Disney does channel its inner Trade Federation with its high prices, but for that amount you do get some good course services. The pre-race area is well laid out, complete with water, porta potties, video screens and host. And once you make your way to the starting area/corrals you get a whole new batch of video screens and two hosts who are way too chipper for 5:00am. NOTE: Oh and a plea to the RunDisney pre-race organizers. Please skip the incredibly cheesy pre-race skits that included your hosts... they were quite painful for everyone to watch. There's so many cool Star Wars-related things you can do (showing movies clips was a good idea) that are way better than this. And while we're at it, claiming your Disneyland ambassadors were "special guests" was a horrific bait & switch. Instead of bringing out some coolStar Wars characters (or perhaps one of the films' actors) just before the start of the race, we were subjected to "punny" banter from two of the most annoying women you've ever met (and remember it was 5am and most of us runners hadn't had caffeine yet). Yup, that pair should have definitely been tossed into the Sarlaac pit to be digested over 1000 years. Disney's solid organization continued onto the course itself. Water stations were well-staffed with volunteers and there were plenty of aid stations. Photographers from MarathonFoto were afoot capturing images of everyone decked out in their Jedi and Sith costumes. And for those unable to make the race, they were able to follow participants with free runner tracking. Disney usually does a good job with their mile markers (some races just have a simple banner) and this was no exception, as they had large "lightsaber inspired" markers complete with digital read-outs. The crowd turn out was decent and a special shout out for the Cos-players who gathered en masse to grace the course later in the race. It was a lot of fun to suddenly witness a a huge cheering line overflowing with stormtroopers, Sith lords, X-Wing pilots, rebel supporters and Mandalorian warriors. FINISH/POST PARTY The finish area (which also doubled as the pre-race area) was designed quite well, which is in keeping with Disney's well-proven ability to manage crowds. Runners were greeted by volunteers with medals and then led off to areas for water, finisher's photos and pre-packaged boxes of snacks. I would have hung around longer but, unfortunately I had plans back in LA (a good friend's wedding later that day) so I was "forced" to make a hasty exit. RECOMMENDATION This was my third high-priced half marathon at Disneyland in the last five months and while they were all fun; they were also very similar. The courses changed a little over the three races, but all basically had the same major elements: Run through the two Disney parks. See the characters specific to that race. Wait in line and take pictures if you want. Then run a very pedestrian stretch of Anaheim. Finally, head back to Disneyland. It really felt like the same race three times over, just with different "themes." In August it was all pure Disney; November was Marvel super-heroes; January it's all things Star Wars. Again, a fun time but I can't see doing all three again in the same year (especially without some serious kind of price break that almost assuredly won't happen). Now if you don't have problem with repetition and have the extra disposable income (or if you just absolutely love anything RunDisney has to offer), then by all means do the trifecta (and don't forget Tinkerbell too... doest that make it a "quadfecta"). As for me, I'm going to pick the "theme" I like best, run that race and skip the rest. And while I love Disney and Marvel superheroes (although at heart I'm a DC boy), nothing trumps Luke Skywalker & Company. I'll expect to be part of this Podrace again come 2016. May The Force be with you.

Review of Orange County Turkey Trot by belindakcarter

Had a great run that day! The course was perfect, and easy to follow. It was super fun, and the swag was awesome. Pumpkin pie, and goodies to pick up afterwards 🙂

Review of Shoreline Half Marathon, 5K, 10K by

As most distance runners know, July is not the prime month for races. Summer vacations and summer heat limit the number of races available around the country. And since the San Francisco Marathon conflicts with ComicCon this year (yup, the geek side of me wins out there) I was desperately looking for a local SoCal race. And with that I chose the Shoreline Half Marathon/10K/5K, a 2nd year race located in Ventura. Definitely a race on the small side (big contrast to the Peachtree Road Race I ran last week with 60,000 runners) all three races combined feature less than 1,000 runners. This year's installment had about 570 people running the half marathon distance and I decided to give it a look see. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registration for the Shoreline Half Marathon was definitely on the inexpensive side with rates only getting to $75 right before the start of the race (no race day registration). What really made the cost reasonable was a 30% discount courtesy of raceshed.com (check 'em out) for a limited number of early registrants. In the end, the race only cost me in the neighborhood of $45 a real bargain in these days of ever-increasing registration costs. In regards to packet pick-up, participants could grab their bibs and shirts the day before the race at the Sport Authority store in Ventura. But like many participants, I opted to save the drive and pick-up my packet on race day (no additional cost). And since I arrived early on race day, I only waited about 5 minutes in order to get my stuff. The lines got longer as the start time approached, but they moved quickly. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING It was about an hour drive from the valley along the 101 to get to Ventura and the start location. As for parking, you did have several options. You can either park at the Crown Plaza parking structure for $8 (some businesses do validate). I also heard you could park at the nearby fairgrounds for $5. I did arrive early on race day and was able to snag one of the cool beachside parking spots (along with the surfers) for a minuscule $2. T-SHIRT/MEDALS The Shoreline Half Marathon provided its participants with a tech running shirt (manufactured by A4) dark blue in color, featuring the Shoreline logo on the front and race sponsors on the back. The shirt was the same for runners of the half marathon, 10K and 5K and is a decent if unremarkable looking shirt. It should be noted that the race also gave all of the race participants a water bottle sporting the race logo, a nice gesutre. The finisher's medal for the race was on the small side (guess we're getting spoiled with our bling) featuring the race's logo and connected by a plain yellow ribbon. One disappointing fact is that finishers received the exact same medal regardless of whether they ran the 5K, 10K or half marathon. I understand it's a cost-saving measure, but it'd be nice in the future to see them differentiate between the races, even if it just means different ribbon designs or different colors on the medal. One additional nice touch from the race is the inclusion of free digital race photos (taken by Santa Barbara Pix). While there were only a few photographers on the course, I did manage to find a start and finish picture along with one more of myself on the course. COURSE The Shoreline Half Marathon features a rather circuitous course (especially for the half marathon runners) that travels along the beach and up through a nearby neighborhood. The course itself is only about 6 miles long, meaning the half marathon runners needed to complete two loops (with an additional spoke added on the first lap). A huge map near the start line displayed the course layout and the race officials explained each race distance route in detail. Given the windy course, I was a little nervous that we might make a wrong turn, but volunteers were situated to make sure we didn't go awry. The course did cut across a few streets with traffic, but police were stationed at each intersection and the runners always had the right of way. One bit of a headache was the beach portion of the race had us running along on the bike path, which wasn't closed to the public. While most people steered clear of the path that day, you did have to meander through some non-participants, especially near the start and finish line. The course itself was basically flat with the exception of two hills leading near the 101 freeway. The course was most enjoyable as we ran along the beach (dodging people notwithstanding) and fairly scenic around mile 6 as you ran fairly near the water and could see the surfers en masse trying to catch waves. The section of the race through the nearby neighborhood (and featuring one turnaround) was rather unremarkable. A note about weather conditions, as the July sun was rather brutal at times and the course afforded little shade... be prepared to cook out there. COURSE SERVICES Course services for the race were in keeping with its size. Water and Gatorade tables were present about every 1.5 miles and Gu's were available at two of the stops. While there were only a limited number of volunteers on the course, they were working hard and seemed to be able manage things fairly well. Basic mile markers were visible on the course, but the only digital clock was at the start/finish, so be sure to bring a GPS. One thing worth noting is the race was timed, although there were only sensors at the start/finish so runners were on their honor not to cut things short. EMTs were located at various points on the course and I did notice a few support people riding around on bicycles making sure runners were okay. Fan support for the race was minimal save for a group of people cheering at the start/finish line, although I did see this one lone spectator at various points during the race (he was traveling to different places on a bike) and I applaud his enthusiasm and support. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY Pretty basic at the end, as you were handed your medal once you crossed the finish line and were directed into the gathering area. The race booth featured some water cups and orange slices, but not much else. A few goodbyes to fellow racers and then I made my way back to my car. RECOMMENDATION It's a little hard to compare this race to other races, given that it was by far the "smallest" race I've completed in 2014 and felt like a Mom & Pop store trying to compete against Target for your business. Given the big production connected to other races (expo trips, parking headaches, huge throngs of people) I did appreciate the easy access and intimate feel. And while it was far less polished than other races, the people involved with the race definitely gave it their all. Given that I only paid $45 for the half marathon, it felt like my money was fairly well spent, especially if I consider it more as an organized and glorified training run than a full-fledged race. One detriment to the race is it's located in Ventura, the same area as the Ventura Marathon (which runs on September 7th). Running two races so close geographically in less than two months might be overkill and I think people will lean more toward the larger race if they need to choose between the two.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Palos Verdes Half Marathon by happyrunnerstanley

It was a great race! The Parking was easy and well communicated. I jumped right on the shuttle and made it to the course. I wish i could have done packet pick up at Road Runner, but did it onsite. They had bib only pickup in the morning, which i guess was because they had a short time to get everyone through and start on time. i ran the 10k, so we started with the 1/2. they had a drone flying around shooting video, so that got everyone to cheer before starting. The course was well marked and there seemed to be plenty of volunteers, they were all cheering us on as we came by. the aid stations were well stocked. i only drank water, but they had Clif blocks and drinks. After the race we all got a cool medal. It is really heavy, i imagine they spent alot on them. also got some trail mix and a Fiji water. There were tons of sponsors in the expo and we got a free brunch (i got the quiche, which was really tasty - good to get some protein). Typically i take off right after a race, but it was so beautiful and lots of people were hanging out, so i stayed and had a beer - Sierra Nevada (it too came for free with the race). I got my shirt and re-usable bag and got a picture at the photobooth. I left around 11am and the shuttle took me right back to the lot where i had parked. Overall, i was really impressed with this race and would definitely do it again. I am not a big reviewer of things, but just thought this experience merited it.

Review of Long Beach International Marathon/Half/5K by kjensen16

I ran the Long Beach half last year and loved the course so I thought I would run my 1st full marathon this year here. Expo: The expo is great! Very well organized. They are ready to take on any problem that you might have as well. They were very quick getting our bibs and shirts to us. The shirts were not the best shirts that Long Beach has had. Really really really did not like that they were white, but the sea shell design on the side was nice. They were also shaped a bit odd. The official merchandise store had quite a large selection of stuff. Loved the hats this year. The expo itself was huge. It really does make OC's expo look funny. It is very spacious and has pretty much all the vendors that you could possibly want. Pre Race: The marathon does not have half as many people as the half marathon so everything is pretty easy for the pre race. It was quick to drop off our stuff at the UPS vans and there were plenty of port o johns with no lines at all. The runners village was pretty great too. It gave our group a great spot to set up camp. It was a great place for our group to meet up before and after the race. Course: The marathon starts off at 6am with the Voice of America's Marathons, Rudy Novotny! The course goes through parts of downtown Long Beach then goes up and over the bridge to the other side of the bay. Then you come back and run on the bike path on the beach. The marathon was not as packed as the half was last year on this part, but the bike path does get very crowded. I would not suggest running on the sand either. From the beach you head north through the neighborhoods as you make your way up to CSULB. There are some pretty interesting houses to look at. The crowd support was awesome! People were setting up aid stations right out of their own house. There were also people all over the place handing out bananas, oranges and candy. These were not people that were associated with the race themselves, just some amazing people cheering on the runners. The aid stations were great too. I believe there were 24 stations all together with one being about every mile or so. You leave the neighborhood streets for a bit when you get onto Atherton. From there you go through Cal Stat Long Beach. Lots of students out cheering you on! Then you start your way back. Running down Ocean was one of my favorite parts of this race (even though I drive it every day to work). It is a beautiful way to finish up a great race. Nice big houses on your right and the ocean on your left. The finish line is great with Rudy calling all the runners in. Post race: We were given the best medal I've ever gotten. Since this was the 30th anniversary it was a special seashell medal. I really love it. We were given a water and a bag full of snacks. We did not finish this race very quickly at all so there were no foil blankets by the time we got there, which I was bummed about. Not a big thing. The beer garden was alright. Just make sure you get over there before 1pm when it closes. Spectators: I had my family and friends that wanted to be out on the course for me. The best place that I found for spectators that want to view their runners more than once and not have to move around is right by the start/ finish line. They can send off their runner at the start line, walk across the grass and see their runner at about mile 6.5 (half and full). Then if they walk up shoreline drive a little bit they can see their runner cross the finish line. Other great spectator spots that would be reasonably easy to get to is up by Cal State Long Beach and over on 7th street by Blair field at recreation park. Overall a great race! I'll run at least the half next year for sure!

Review of Silverman 70.3 Ironman by RaceGrader

I can't give anything but straight "A"'s for this event. Ironman did a great job. PRE RACE: We made the decision to arrive on Friday to help avoid any stress. It was a great decision. We were able to check in around 6pm with no lines. That gave us the ability to be ahead of the crowds on Saturday. With this race, you are required to drop your run gear at T2 and bike at T1 the day before the race (although, you were able to access both transitions early on race day). Because we checked in Friday, we had our transitions set up my mid afternoon on Saturday and were able to relax the rest of the day. Ironman Village was a bit small but took place at the Henderson Pavillion. A great location for the finish line. RACE DAY: Ironman provided shuttles from T2 up to Lake Mead. We arrived around 5AM and did not have to wait in line. Because of the recent heat, there was a serious chance that wetsuits would not be allowed. But after measuring the temperature on race day at 75 degrees, wetsuits were declared legal for the event. A big relief for those that rely on the wetsuit for buoyancy! THE SWIM course was a basic triangle. Out, over, and back into the beach. There were numerous buoys for sighting and the water was clear. The most difficult part of the swim was the "convergence" of waves. It seemed like many people thought it was a bit crowded out there. Maybe they could move the waves to 4 minutes apart instead of 3? Also, it was tough to get a feel for the distance remaining on the swim back to the beach. I was sighting off a building on the beach that was at a much higher elevation than the water level. This gave the impression the beach was miles away. Not an event problem, but just something to consider for future athletes. Ironman did number the buoys. If I had known this, I would've been able to use them to determine how far was still remaining. Good reason to go to the pre-race meeting (I didn't attend). BIKE: Hills. I could pretty much stop right there. This bike course is brutally tough. There is very little relief from the climbs. I believe you climb over 4,200 feet with a net increase of nearly 2,700. Way more UP than DOWN. The bike course reminded me of the movie Ground Hog Day. Climb...climb...climb...down...climb...climb...climb...down...etc.. A good strategy is very important on this course. You can NOT just go out an hammer away at these hills. You'll have nothing left for the run (or the huge climb that awaits you at mile 54). It's very important to stay within your own pace and have a very good nutrition plan. Take a look at the number of people with DNF's for this event. I'm sure many of them were the people passing me as they powered up every hill. I would say this to summarize the bike course. First 10 miles are rolling hills (mostly climbing). The next 12 miles are very difficult. Basically all climbing with not much downhill relief. The next 12 miles are the reverse (these 12 miles are out and back). Although, the headwind made it difficult to really take full advantage of the net "downhill". At mile 42 there is a 2-3 mile climb. It's a serious grind from inside Lake Mead to the top of the hill by Lake Las Vegas entrance. From mile 42 to 52ish you are mostly down and flat. It seems like this is the time you'd make up some ground. But the race gods turned ugly and ruined those plans with a fairly decent headwind that taxed your legs even further. At mile 52 you encounter yet another big climb. I didn't hear much "chatter" on the course to that point. But when my fellow participants turned the corner to see this hill, many were cursing and calling for the course designers head! After climbing pretty much all day, you have to grind it out one last time from mile 52 pretty much all the way to the transition area. I finished the bike 45 minutes slower than my Half Ironman distance P.R. And I worked way harder! My bike time of 3:25 put me just above the 50 percentile in my age division. THE RUN: Did I mention it was hot? You don't really feel the heat until you put on those running shoes and started to go. Someone mentioned it may have reached 96 degrees in the afternoon. So again, nutrition is key! Fortunately Ironman did a great job with their aid stations. The course was a total of 3 loops and there were 4 aid stations. So 12 total chances to get "refreshed" on the 13.1 mile run. In most cases, loops tend to get a bit boring. But it's great for spectators. They can set up in the shade and see you run by the same point 6 times. The aid stations were fully stocked with ice (savior), water, propel, cola, chips, pretzels, oranges, banana's, gu's, etc.... it was basically a "much needed" buffet with enthusiastic volunteers. There were also a few "run through" mist systems on the course. And one was stationed with a guy hosing people down. That felt awesome!! Besides fighting the heat, this run course was HILLY. You think you had enough with the hills on the bike, but there really isn't any FLAT in Silverman. During the 4+mile loop, you go down 2 miles than up 2 miles. Repeat. Repeat. It's similar to running long intervals. If you grind out the "up" you can take advantage of the "down". Although with the demanding bike course and heat, I saw a ton of athletes walking or being sidelined with cramps/hamstring issues. POST RACE: Anyone that has done a long distance event knows you really feel brain dead after you cross the finish line. It's often times difficult to even function. Ironman had some great volunteers. As I crossed the line, someone became my personal escort. They took me to get my medal, remove my timing chip, grab my finishers hat, handed me an ice cold water, took me to get a finisher picture, then directed me to the athlete tent. It was a great service. Thank you to whoever you were helping me out! The athlete tent had a great setup with a full buffet of food and drinks. After cooling down, you pick up all your gear that was driven down by Ironman from Lake Mead. It was very organized and (again) staffed with great volunteers. Someone even had bagged my bike gear left on the ground at T2. First class all the way. OVERALL: I heard a few people saying this is the toughest course in America. Other's said they put out more effort on this course than they needed for a full Ironman. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but the course was more than just a challenge. It was VERY TOUGH. Proof were the number of people suffering on a course. But the with the great challenge, comes a great feeling of accomplishment. Knowing you can survive and finish an event like this gives you great confidence for any future challenges. Silverman was a great event and Ironman did a great job.

Review of Rock N Roll Los Angeles Half Marathon by Scott Devine

RACE: Los Angeles Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon DATE: October 26, 2014 LOCATION: Downtown Los Angeles DISTANCES: Half Marathon/5K START TIME: 7:00am WEATHER AT START: 61°/ Partly Cloudy FINISHERS: 7762 (Half Marathon)/ 1264 (5K) This year marked the 5th running of the LA Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon as thousands of costume-clad Angelenos lined the streets near the Staples Center for a pre-Halloween romp through the city streets. REGISTRATION/EXPO As part of the Rock 'n' Roll series, registration costs for the LA Rock 'n' Roll Half tend to be on the higher side, but there are plenty of ways around paying out through the nose. Of course, first of all you can always pay as early as possible before rates go up. In addition, you could choose one of the group deals that Rock 'n' Roll offers, either the season pass or the 3-pack of races for $199 (the route I went this year). In addition, Rock 'n' Roll likes to give discounts through social media (check your FB page) and they typically run a $13 off special for all of their races on the 13th of each month. The expo for the race was held at the LA Convention Center in downtown Los Angeles. Convention Center parking was $10 and there are also plenty of nearby lots for you to choose from. I decided to stretch my legs a bit and parked a few blocks away, saving myself the parking cost and instead fed a meter for far less. The expo itself is a decent size, with plenty of vendors on hand for you to check out the latest racing gear, sample some of the running grub available or sign up for upcoming races. And once again, the main sponsor for this year's race was the ASPCA, so their paw prints were all over the expo as racers stepped up to show their support for our four-legged friends. NOTE: Runners had to pick up their own bibs; no exceptions. MEDALS/SHIRT/SWAG The LA Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon seems to have planted itself firmly on the weekend closest to Halloween, so "things that go bump in the night" have become an ongoing presence, blended with the series' Rock 'n' Roll theme. Racers voted for the medal this year (from three options), which features a guitar-riding witch sailing over the LA skyline complete with a giant spider web in the background. The design is a bit busy, but still a decent bit of bling complete with a Halloween-orange ribbon (yellow for the 5K). And the Rock 'n' Roll series does have additional bling for those people running multiple races this year, including the "Cali Combo" and their signature "heavy medals." Racers didn't get to vote on the tech shirt, which is a shame because this year's edition felt like a step backward from last year's cool design. The 2014 shirt is white in color (sorry, I'm just not a fan of white shirts... I feel it's lazy) and featured a gray muted mash-up design of musical notes, speakers, palm trees and a witch (remember, it's Halloween) overlaid by an orange-colored outline of the letters "LA." In my opinion, not one of their better shirts (give the racers a say next year, perhaps). Racers were also given a black drawstring backpack, which doubled as a gear check bag. TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Since the race begins near the Staples Center, parking is not much of an issue (as long as you avoid the street closures) and racers can park at the convention center or one of the nearby lots. But be prepared to spend anywhere from $10-$20. I chose to take the Metrorail downtown, parking at the Universal City lot and grabbing the Red Line train to 7th Street (about 1/3 mile from the start area). Round trip only cost $3.50 ($1.75 each way, plus $1 if you need a TAP card) or you can purchase a day pass for $7. The trip for me only took about 30 minutes on the train, about the same as driving downtown and finding parking, plus it's pretty stress-free. COURSE The course was the same as last year, featuring a modified "Out & Back" route. Starting at the Staples Center you head south on city streets, looping around the LA Coliseum and making your way back past the Staples Center around mile 6. After that, you head north through the 2nd Street tunnel, along Figueroa and Flower before a back & forth across the popular 6th Street bridge and then back toward downtown and the finish. The course itself is mostly flat with the only true incline being on the 6th St. bridge (and you do get to run back down it). I once again had an issue with the length of the course, as it seemed to be longer than 13.1 miles (my GPS came in at almost 13.4). Be sure to cut corners as tight as etiquette allows and don't weave too much, if you want to make sure you don't add too much length. NOTE: Be aware that your GPS will almost certainly lose its connection during your two trips through the 2nd St. tunnel. Fortunately, my Garmin recalculated shortly after emerging both times. SERVICES LA Rock 'n' Roll typically has decent course services at their races. Plenty of porta-potties were on hand at the start line and there were adequate water/energy drink stops (Gatorade Endurance was the drink of choice for 2014) manned by energetic volunteers. Gu gels were given out around mile 9 on the course. I also saw plenty of medical tents along with support personnel cruising the course on bicycles. I did have an issue with one of the services, as I signed up for runner tracking (along with a friend or two) and no one received any text updates. Not sure if there was a ghost in the machine (remember, it's Halloween) system wide or just a glitch with mine. FINISH/POST PARTY Rock 'n' Roll races also tend to have good finish line/post race activities. After receiving my finisher's medal from a volunteer I made my way along the chute and received a decent array of snacks, including: water, chocolate milk, gatorade, tiny bags of snack mix and bananas. Once again, no bags on hand to carry our post-race bounty, but maybe they'll get it right next year. The post party was located near the exterior of the Nokia Theater and featured a stage with music and a Michelob Ultra beer tent (each 21+ racer got a ticket for a free post-race brew along with their bib). There were also a few other vendors around giving out some swag as well as Rock 'n' Roll tent where runners could grab some last minute race merchandise. RECOMMENDATION This was my second time running the LA Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon and it felt very similar (not in a bad way) to last year's race. I enjoy the runners in costumes as well as the downtown course. And while there is room for improvement... better job on the shirts next year please, it's a fun local race, well-organized and one that I plan to continue on an annual basis.

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Palos Verdes Half Marathon by Runner3D

The Pre race was easy-pasy. We got to the parking smoothly and with no wait even though we had to take the shuttle since the other two parking lots were over capacity. It didn't take long to get to the venue from where we got on the shuttle. I picked up my packet (only the bib) that morning and did not have to deal with any lines for the half marathon. I was told that I would only be able to pick up my shirt and bag after the race. There were no lines at the porta potties so I was able to take care of business and jump into where the race started. The 13.1 course was a scenic route along Palos Verdes Drive South and Paseo Del Mar. Anyone familiar with PV knows to expect hills and the PV half did not disappoint. Rolling hills throughout the course made the run a fun challenge. There were plenty of volunteers with water/electrolyte gels, mile markers, porta potties, & split mats. Got to the end and received some trail mix, a bottle of fiji water and medal. Post race I picked up my bag and T shirt. By that time one of the volunteers said that there were no more women's small. However they let me choose a men's small in lieu of them running out. Although the t shirt is a really cool tech T shirt, the men's small is still too big for me. There were a wide selection of vendors and sponsors at the event sharing samples and informational literature. This half provided a bunch and there were two options: crossiant, apple, cheese and boiled egg box, and a quiche with tangerine.I really wanted some protein so I picked the latter of the two but wished that between the two that we'd get more of the quiche since it was small in size. If I had to be picky I wish there was more balance between the two. There was an option to get your free after the race beer, but I don't drink. Overall it was a great race and I'd definitely do it again.

Review of Veterans Day Run - San Diego by mariemadeline

This race was by far the most unorganized race I have ever done. I participated in the race on November 8, 2014, but this listing if for last year's run. They did not give clear driving directions, and there was not enough parking for the runners. The post race was very lacking and the race crew was not very helpful when asked any questions. They advertised that the race was chip timed, and I had asked if there was a time limit, but they told me there wasn't. They did, however, stop recording race times at 45 minutes, even though there were still some participants that had not completed the race, and I was one of those participants. I e-mailed and messaged for 4 days, but received no response of any kind. I will never participate in a race organized by Race Operations, Inc., also known as Heavenly Racing. This company has an F rating at the BBB for not responding to any complaints. Stay away!

Review of Great Donut Run by lawiii

The most fun and delicious 5k ever!! This is a perfect event for the whole family, and a guaranteed good time will he had by all.

Review of Great Donut Run by belindakcarter

Such a fun race! Loved the donut holes and whip cream shooters on the course! I'll be at the next one!

Review of Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Riverside by amberlouise

This was my 2nd half marathon and it was a great experience! Everything ran smoothly and the course was fairly easy (and flat). They offered all sorts of energy boosters along the way, and bananas before and after the race. Parking was easy at the park, and I got there about 30 min. before the race. I would definitely run this again!

Review of San Diego Half Marathon by ashleyspotts

Awesome race! Best support I have ever seen! Aid stations had water, electrolytes, salt, vaseline, & first aid; so many portas! I felt so spoiled! It was also supported with 3 high school marching bands which nearly made me tear up with sentiment & was so energizing. I'd choose band over a dj anyday. It made it feel like a true community event. Lots of folks came out of their houses with signs, cheering, & even snacks! A woman was handing out donuts on one corner, & a man with his very small son with popsicles! How great is that?! It was well organized with pacers. Well organized on the course. It was mostly beautiful, but unavoidably we went through some stinky sketchy areas. The hill at mile 8(?) was INSANE, but an awesome challenge for dedicated runners. The metal is lovely! I highly recommend! It would be great to travel to as it's a wonderful San Diego experience but a must for locals who love the area.

Review of Pacific Beachfest 5K by ashleyspotts

Pre-race was a good. Parking was what you can expect in San Diego. We parked a few blocks away, but it was free & not too difficult. I loved being able to pick up my bib at the race which so many are beginning to shy away from. There was no wait. There were a TON of booths & vendors which was so fun. It's already neat to walk around the PB beach, the vendors made it unreal fun. The race itself was AWFUL. I've done many 5ks, half marathons, obstacles, relays, & this was the worst by far. It's was a crowded race, so running the in the sand was almost a fight for survival: walkers blocked the middle as they usually do because they don't care about anyone but themselves so the actual runners had either run very close to the water or on the very slanted dry sand on the edge, which you can imagine is very challenging. It was not very well blocked off. Yes, it's a public beach, but with no staff along the path, the public had no respect for the race. We were jumping over children & sand castles, weaving around gawkers walking as slow as possible across our path to get to the surf. The worst part yet though was when we ran up to the boardwalk itself. It was lovely getting back on hard ground, but again, there was almost no support or blockage from the public. Runners were struggling to avoid beach cruisers, walkers, dogs, & the general public. The path is a two lane style bike sidewalk, and at some point a frantic volunteer came running up and down yelling at us to stick the inside lane, which had all spread out from since it was so narrow & there were so many other pedestrians. This all could have been solved with well placed volunteers with some level of enthusiasm so as to merit respect & distance from the public. Rather, the neighborhood seemed to look at us as if they had never seen a race before & didn't know what to do. It was like sitting in traffic because there's a huge wreck: everyone wants to gawk. To have a race at such a popular San Diego location, there must be logistical support to keep it SANE. The music was cool. The medal was cool. The beach itself is beautiful. I would NOT recommend this race.

Review of Great Donut Run by miketherunner12

Ran this last year with my wife and infant -- the little guy's first race! It was a blast! The course was more entertaining than your average themed-race, which was nice because our friends who we invited hadn't run anything like this before. Everyone loved it, and there were plenty of extra donuts, if that's your thing. I was surprised how many people showed up with costumes and props! People really love their donuts. The shirts and medals were very cool, and most importantly, it was well organized. The start was like a little party, good tunes. What else... plenty of water and porta-potties, and the staggered start was great because it gave us more room for our stroller.

Review of Long Beach International Marathon/Half/5K by Scott Devine

In 1984, Long Beach hosted its first marathon. In the three decades since, the race has become a popular annual event in southern California featuring almost 20,000 participants enjoying one of the many races they offer, including: the full marathon, half marathon, bike tour and 5K. This past Sunday the race celebrated its 30th anniversary and Long Beach was once again packed with energetic runners and cyclists ready to pound (and ride) the pavement of this seaside city. I ran the half marathon (my fourth time running the route) and will focus my review on that distance. REGISTRATION/PACKET PICK-UP Registration costs for the Long Beach Half Marathon are in keeping with standard half marathons. The key as always is to sign up sooner rather than later to avoid the higher fees. I registered for the race back about 6 months ago and paid around $80 for the half marathon. You can find occasional discounts online or at race expos. Packet pick-up for the race is on the Friday and Saturday before the marathon, located at the Long Beach Convention Center. Expo parking is $10, but street parking is available if you don't mind parking a few blocks away. I ended up about a half mile from the convention center and meter parked for the cost of a few quarters. The pick-up process is pretty quick, but be sure to bring a copy of your signed release form (they e-mail you it ahead of time) as you need to have it in order to get your bib. And just to be safe, bring a blank one along with you as you'll invariably find someone looking for a blank form (they don't print 'em out for you). Fortunately, you can pick up the bib for a friend or family member, but again be sure to have their signed release form and a picture of their ID. The expo itself is good sized and featured plenty of vendors showing off their latest wares and advertising upcoming races. I myself picked up a few new items to try out and a few bits of swag (can you ever have enough bottle openers and water bottles). TRANSPORTATION/PARKING Those people traveling to Long Beach for the race should be aware of potential traffic problems. With about 20,000 people trying to reach LB in a short span of time, traffic back-up is inevitable. And since a huge number of people funnel onto the 710 freeway, it can become quite the quagmire as race time approaches. The race advises you to arrive 90 minutes prior to your race start time and that is some advice worth following. Better to get to the race early and relax near the start line, than to get a few extra minutes of sleep only to end up sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic wondering if you'll make it to the start in time (I almost missed the start of the race in 2011 and it was no fun whatsoever). As for parking, there are a good number of spots at the convention center, the Pike Shopping Center and various lots around town. You can pre-purchase parking passes and expect to spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $10 whether you purchase ahead of time or at the lot itself. This year I managed to find a parking bargain ($5) at a public lot about a half mile from the start line. And again, it's worth getting there early to save yourself some stress and making sure you don't come across lots at capacity. T-SHIRT/MEDALS/SWAG The Long Beach Marathon consistently utilizes a nautical theme when it comes to their shirts and medals (as well as signage). Past years have focused on the Queen Mary, palm trees on the beach and the Rainbow Harbor lighthouse. For the 30th edition of the Long Beach race, the scallop shell gets its moment in the spotlight. The familiar casing for that oh so yummy bivalve mollusk is front and center on just about everything race-related this year. The finisher's medal for the race features a silver scallop shell highlighted by sparkly blue text reading "30th anniversary" and a blue ring listing the distance of the particular race. All of the various medals (marathon, half marathon, bike tour, 5k) are basically the same design, just varying in size. The ribbon is white, blue and silver and lists the race distance run. They're nice and elegant medals and will look good on your medal rack (or wherever you hang your bling). And for those of you who like challenge medals, the Long Beach Marathon is one of the three races comprising the Beach Cities Challenge. Finish this race along with Surf City and Orange County and you can earn the impressive 2014 challenge medal (a new "clasp shell" design will be offered stating at Surf City in 2015). As much as I liked the finisher's medal, I did not like the tech shirt at all. Last year's shirt design introduced a more "minimalist" look where the majority of the shirt is a solid color (blue in the case of 2013) with the design/logo wrapping around one side of the bottom of the shirt. It kinda worked with last year's shirt. This year... not at all. The 3oth anniversary shirt started off committing what many consider to be the cardinal sin of race shirts: it's white... really white. And given the small logo and muted scallop shell wrapping around the side (so muted at first glance you wonder if it's inside out) this shirt looks like a big white mistake. Here's hoping they get enough negative feedback to revamp their shirts (and add some color) for the 31st anniversary shirt. The swag bag featured some fliers and a few freebies (there's also a virtual swag bag online), but one bit of swag worth noting is that each racer gets a free entry to the Aquarium of the Pacific during the month of October. It's a great aquarium, by the way, and worth another trip to Long Beach. COURSE The Long Beach Half Marathon basically features a looping course that begins and ends near the water by the convention center. If you like waterfront views, then this a course for you. Starting near the Pike Shopping Center, the course meanders down the main drag before heading up and over the Queensway Bridge that then winds around near the water and takes you in and around Rainbow Harbor, including a nice view of the Queen Mary. Continuing on through Pierpoint Landing and Shoreline Village you make your way onto the running path on the beach (which stretches from about mile 6.5- 10). The beach path is a scenic (and sometimes windy) path, but it also is a bit narrow and can cause a little bit of congestion. Around mile 10 you climb the bluffs and head back along Ocean Blvd. making your way to the finish back near the convention center. The full marathoners share the half marathon course, until splitting off around the 10.5 mile mark and then rejoining it around the 24 mile mark. The course itself is mostly flat with only a few inclines, most notably the Queensway Bridge. While I haven't run the full marathon, the half marathon course is rather scenic, giving you the flavor of Long Beach and a nice view of the Pacific. COURSE SERVICES The Long Beach Marathon has been around for thirty years now and has had plenty of time to iron out any kinks. The course services for the race are basic but solid, featuring plenty of well-manned water/Powerade stops. Cliff was also present, giving out gels around the 10-mile mark. The course also featured plenty of porta-potties at the start, aid stations and support staff to handle any problems that may arise. Mile markers were present at each mile, although the only digital clocks were at the start/finish. Long Beach did offer runner tracking, however my friends/family only received text updates for the 5k and 10K splits (might want to look into that). Race results were posted shortly after the race and one additional nice touch is RunPix graphics that give you detailed info about how you fared in the race. FINISH LINE SERVICES/POST PARTY One aspect of the Long Beach race that kind of irks me is the finish line/post party. The services themselves are fine... water, snacks (handed out in bags, thank you very much) and a free beer (for those of us runners over 21). What gets me is that the post party feels very claustrophobic, as if the crowds are too large in relation to the space they set aside for the party. After being funneled through the finish area, which is a little too tight to begin with, you're dropped into a sea of family members and other runners to fend for yourself. While there are food trucks, vendors and other services, they don't seem to be organized with any real logic, nor is there sufficient signage to point out where things are. I typically enjoy hanging out for a little bit at post race parties, but every time at Long Beach I find myself feeling like a salmon swimming upstream. So I typically grab my snacks, drink my complimentary brew (yay carbs) and then make a beeline for the exit. Given the overall good organization for the rest of the race, it's an aspect I wish the race officials would give a long hard look at improving. RECOMMENDATION As I said earlier, I've run the Long Beach Half Marathon four times now. I like this race; I really do like it. But I don't love it. It's a solid and fairly well organized affair, but it does have a few shortcomings and lacks the extra touches that could elevate it to the next level. The race is reasonably priced, local and part of the Beach City Challenge (a series I like). I'll continue to run it each year when it fits my schedule, but I wouldn't be overly heartbroken if I missed it from time to time.

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